District 6 Supervisor candidate Matt Haney took a strong lead in early returns for District 6. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

District 6 Supervisor candidate Matt Haney took a strong lead in early returns for District 6. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

School board member Matt Haney out front in D6 Supervisors race

School board member Matt Haney is out front in the early returns in the race to represent the Tenderloin and South of Market on the Board of Supervisors.

Haney, the progressive candidate is ahead of two moderate contenders in District 6 with a more than 2,000 vote lead in first-choice voting, putting him over 50 percent of the vote in early returns.

The moderate challengers Christine Johnson, a former planning commissioner, and Sonja Trauss, a founder of the YIMBY movement, collaborated on a ranked-choice voting strategy against San Francisco Unified School Board member and progressive candidate Matt Haney.

Johnson remained hopeful. “We don’t know the results yet,” she said. “Too few votes have been counted.”

The tally is of those vote by mail ballots received before Tuesday by the Department of Elections. Updated counts will continue through the night.

Drug dealing, homelessness and feces on the sidewalks were among the issues debated by the three candidates vying to represent the Tenderloin and South of Market Area.

Supervisor Jane Kim currently represents the traditionally progressive district and is termed out in January.

Johnson and Trauss both benefited from about $350,000 in third-party spending, or independent expenditures, from Progress for All, a group whose donors are largely real estate interests and tech leaders. The Police Officers Association also backed Johnson and Trauss, as did Mayor London Breed.

Haney benefited to a lesser extent from third-party spending, about $180,000 such as from SEIU Local 2015, a labor union representing home care worker.

For more Examiner election coverage go to:
http://www.sfexaminer.com/sf-votes-november-2018-election-coverage/

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