Local grocer returns home

Entrepreneurs, shoppers and city officials celebrated the return of a historic 50-year old family-run grocery store to a little neighborhood between San Francisco’s Western Addition and Alamo Square Thursday after a six-year absence.

Mayor Gavin Newsom, Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi and James “Tick” Falletti, owner of Falletti Foods, cut the ribbon on his new 6,000 square-foot shop at the corner of Broderick and Fell streets, part of the new Broderick Place development put together by his family, The Lalanne Group and Signature Properties.

The 16,500 square-foot development also includes 70 condominiums, a Bank of America and several other businesses.

“You have prepared a banquet for all your sons and daughters,” said St. Ignatius Church pastor Father Charles Gagan, after praying for the recently-deceased James Kim, and before blessing all the businesses in Broderick Place.

In 1956, Falletti’s father, Jim, and uncle, Lou Falletti, opened the original Falletti Foods six blocks away. They and their family continued in business until the end of the 1990s, when they lost their lease. Their other family-owned grocery in Foster City also closed, Falletti said, leaving them seeking a new opportunity. They had a lot of support.

“When the Fallettis lost their lease at Masonic and Fulton [streets], one of the neighborhood groups said, ‘We want to find you a new location,’” Robert Lalanne said, citing the Alamo Square Neighborhood Association and groups from the North of Panhandle, Buena Vista Heights, the Haight and Divisadero neighborhoods.

Seeing that the local Bank of America branch had a big property across from the DMV office with a large, underused parking lot, Falletti said he approached the bank about selling its land. The bank agreed, with the condition that it receive a long-term lease in the new development. Lalanne, fresh from his Alamo Square McAllister Mews project, was brought on as developer, and later Signature Properties came aboard.

The new store also kept a few old faces.

“It’s nice. This job, I started in high school, I went to college … I paid for college working here,” said Falletti General Manager Alan Miloslavich, who spent the interim between the past and present stores as a general contractor. “To come back to the neighborhood … is unheard of.”

In grocery years, 2000 was a long time ago. Organic and natural products hadn’t yet hit the mainstream. Neighborhood grocery stores were convinced they had to go big. Now, Falletti said, his store will focus on having a range of foods and price points, including higher-end natural products, and will focus on being a good small grocery.

There are 11 condo units left for sale in the development, primarily two-bedrooms.

“We worked hard to make a project that would meet the character of the neighborhood but be a nice addition,” Signature President Michael Ghielmetti said, adding that the development is more family-sized than many. “The sizes are a little bit bigger than you see in some San Francisco condos.”

Businesses in Broderick Place

» Falletti Foods

» Peet’s Coffee & Tea

» Delessio Market & Bakery

» Bank of America

» La Conesta

» Another business to be determined

Source: James Falletti

kwilliamson@examiner.com

businessBusiness & Real Estate

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Health care workers would be the first group in the state to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. (Go Nakamura/Getty Images/TNS)
Hope on the way: Here’s what to know about California’s COVID-19 vaccine plan

The first batch of doses could hit the state as soon as early December

The Big Game was played Friday at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley. (Shutterstock)
Stanford blocks extra point to stun Cal, win 123rd Big Game 24-23

The 123rd edition of the Big Game featured a number of firsts.… Continue reading

Psilocybin magic mushrooms (Shutterstock)
‘Magic mushrooms’ moving into the mainstream

Efforts to decriminalize psychedelics could follow several different paths

The 2020 Census has concluded taking responses sooner than expected. (Courtesy photo)
What does California have to lose if undocumented immigrants are excluded from the census?

By Kim Bojórquez The Sacramento Bee If The U.S. Supreme Court rules… Continue reading

Those who stick around San Francisco on long holiday weekends can enjoy a slower pace, uncrowded streets and beloved institutions like cable cars. <ins>(Kevin Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
These empty San Francisco streets: A holiday dream

We’re here because we can be, and because we have nowhere else to be

Most Read