Lee Harvey Oswald is pictured in police custody in Dallas, following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, on Nov. 22, 1963. (Courtesy UTA Special Collections/Star-Telegram Collection/TNS)

Don’t hold your breath over recently public JFK records

OK, so the National Archives has released some 2,800 records associated with the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy in 1963.

At the order of President Donald Trump, they were put online by the National Archives and Records Administration on Thursday in compliance with a 1992 law prompted by Oliver Stone’s 1991 conspiracy-themed movie “JFK.”

In the excellent film, Kevin Costner played New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison, who charged businessman Clay Shaw (played by Tommy Lee Jones) for his alleged participation in a conspiracy to assassinate the president; in real life, Lee Harvey Oswald was found responsible by the Warren Commission.

But who’s reading the records? As of press time, there were no reports of juicy details gleaned from the newly available material.

Even NPR and the New York Times were soliciting “help” from the public, asking folks to share interesting tidbits they may encounter among the overwhelming entries on the archives’ site.

Chances are, however, that nothing terribly provocative will come to light, because thousands of additional papers have been withheld at the request of the CIA and FBI.

The remaining records are being reviewed over the next 180 days; those deemed “safe” will be released April 26, 2018.

TECH HELPED TRUMP

Even though Donald Trump accused high tech world of siding with Hillary Clinton in last year’s election, a new study revealed that his presidential campaign got a bigger boost than expected from Facebook, Twitter and Google.

Daniel Kreiss from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Shannon McGregor from the University of Utah found that the Trump campaign received “critical” support that included tech company employees who “frequently acted more like political operatives,” according to the website Politico.

“The extent to which they were helping candidates online was a surprise to us,” said co-author Daniel Kreiss, from UNC Chapel Hill. He called the assistance “a form of subsidy from technology firms to political candidates.”

The scholars interviewed tech company liaisons to Trump and Clinton operations and officials from campaigns including those of former Gov. Jeb Bush and Sens. Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio.

LOCAL ARTS NEWS

Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett’s Found Footage Festival, a showcase of “odd and hilarious found videos” at the Roxie today and Saturday, includes a rarely seen “Welcome Home Desert Storm” parade clip with Roseanne Barr and rapper Gerardo, and selections from David Letterman’s VHS Collection donated by the TV host when he retired.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

TV personality Kelly Osbourne is 33. … Singer Simon LeBon of Duran Duran is 59. … Writer Maxine Hong Kingston is 77. … Actor-comedian John Cleese is 78.

— Staff, wire reports
Daniel KeissJFK assassinationLee Harvey OswaldNational Archives and Records AdministrationpaperstechTrumpWarren Commission

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