Voters favor Prop. C, which lifts citizenship requirement for service on SF advisory bodies

San Francisco voters are favoring a measure lifting a citizenship requirement for people to serve on government advisory bodies.

San Francisco voters are favoring a measure lifting a citizenship requirement for people to serve on government advisory bodies.

In returns released early Wednesday morning, 179,225 residents (54.29 percent) percent voted yes for Proposition C, which was introduced by Supervisor Shamann Walton and placed on the ballot with a unanimous vote by the Board of Supervisors.

The measure amends The City’s Charter to allow non-citizens to serve on government advisory bodies. Currently, there is a requirement that those who serve on the bodies are registered to vote, which means they have to be at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen.

Walton said, “This is of course a pivotal time for us in history to remove the barrier of allowing undocumented immigrants a voice at the table.”

The only argument against the measure in the voter ballot book came from the San Francisco Republican Party.

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