Repairs to Salesforce Transit Center near construction milestone

Repairs to the Salesforce Transit Center are about to hit a major milestone, transit officials said Wednesday.

Large hydraulic jacks supporting the Salesforce Transit Center at Fremont Street are set to come down within “weeks,” said Dennis Turchon, senior construction manager at the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, which operates the transit center.

Those support jacks were put in place in October after steel cracks were found in beams at the $2.2 billion transit center, prompting its closure. A reopening date has not yet been announced, but Turchon said construction work is on track to finish by June 1.

Turchon and a Transbay Joint Powers Authority spokesperson led reporters on a tour of the facility Wednesday to see the repair process up close.

Twelve-feet long steel plates that were machined in Pennsylvania and delivered to the Stockton-based steel fabricator, Herrick, in March were ready to be installed to reinforce the building where the cracked steel beams used to be.

“We are making satisfactory progress,” Turchon told reporters. “Better than we hoped.”

A building review has found no additional issues to date, according to the TJPA.

Once construction is done, Turchon emphasized re-opening won’t be as easy as flicking a switch.

An independent peer review called for by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission must also be completed, which may require additional inspections, according to the TJPA. The building must also be recommissioned, which requires further inspections and permitting from city and state agencies. Bus operations must also be planned and transitioned from the temporary Transbay Terminal, which includes coordination with AC Transit and the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. Shopkeepers and cafe-operators must rev up operations again.

In short, it won’t be quick.

Still, Turchon said, “TJPA is very eager to get operational again.”

joe@sfexaminer.com

Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gives an update on repairs to a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. The $2.2-billion facility has been closed since September, less than two months after it opened in August. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gives an update on repairs to a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, leads reporters through the main entrance of Salesforce Transit Center to provide an update on repairs to a cracked steel beam on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Construction workers move through a restricted area around a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gave an update on repairs to the cracked steel beam that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Construction workers move through a restricted area around a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gave an update on repairs to the cracked steel beam that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gives an update on repairs to a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, points to a steel girder that will help strengthen a cracked steel beam as he gives an update on the repair work at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, points to the shoring system that is supporting a cracked steel beam as he gives an update on repair efforts at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Numerous steel girders are displayed as Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gives an update on repairs to a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Numerous steel girders are displayed as Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gives an update on repairs to a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, points to a cracked steel beam while standing next to a shoring system that has been in place since October at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, points to a cracked steel beam while standing next to a shoring system that has been in place since October at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, points to a cracked steel beam while standing next to a shoring system that has been in place since October at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
A closer look at a steel girder that is being used to strengthen a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
A closer look at a steel girder that is being used to strengthen a cracked steel beam at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
An area is cordoned off around a cracked steel beam and shoring system at Salesforce Transit Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gave an update on repairs to the cracked steel beam that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
A jogger runs past the Fremont Street entrance to Salesforce Transit Center near the shoring system that is holding up a cracked steel beam on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gave an update on repairs to the beam that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Two men walk past the Fremont Street entrance to Salesforce Transit Center near the shoring system that is holding up a cracked steel beam on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Dennis Turchon, Senior Construction Manager for the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, gave an update on repairs to the beam that has shuttered the $2.2-billion facility since September. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

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