Presidio Trust board rejects development proposal for Fort Winfield Scott

Presidio Trust board rejects development proposal for Fort Winfield Scott

Fort Winfield Scott at The Presidio in San Francisco will not be developed for the time being after the Presidio Trust Board of Directorsvoted Wednesday night against a proposal to turn it into a campus for “mission-driven organizations.”

According to the proposal, several organizations sought to turn the fort into a home for organizations focused on environmental and social issues. The proposal also sought to rehabilitate the historic buildings and landscapes and convert it into a “model of environmental sustainability,” Presidio Trust officials said.

“We had a robust and transparent and well-run process to determine whether we could partner with mission-driven organizations to develop Fort Winfield Scott,” the board’s chair William Grayson said in a statement.

“We greatly appreciate the time and thoughtfulness that the consortium put into this proposal. However, it ultimately didn’t meet enough of the Presidio Trust’s requirements to move forward,” he said.

According to Presidio Trust officials, the proposal did not guarantee that the fort would remain a mission-driven campus for the duration of the lease. The proposal also didn’t include the cost of relocating U.S. Park Police from the site, nor did it include a transportation plan.

The 30-acre Fort Winfield Scott site at the Presidio, a former military post, is made up of historic buildings, landscapes, walking trails and athletic fields near the Golden Gate Bridge.

The World Economic Forum, Equity Community Builders, EPIC Institure, the California Clean Energy Fund, OpenAI, The Lela Goren Group, and the We Company submitted the joint proposal, received on May 24, Presidio Trust officials said.

For now, the Trust will concentrate on developing other sites within the 1,191 acres it manages, with the goal of generating revenue in order to develop Fort Scott in phases in the future.

Planning

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