Runners cross the finish line near Ocean Beach during the 106th Bay to Breakers in 2017. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner file photo)

Bay to Breakers goes virtual in 2021

Runs may be completed between May 16 and June 2

Runners who want to keep The City’s Bay to Breakers tradition alive are invited to participate in the iconic race virtually this year.

Although the huge, more than century-old race had been moved to Aug. 22 in hopes of having runners gather in person this year, organizers announced Friday that, due to the continued impact of COVID-19, it will be produced as a virtual event.

Participants have the option to complete their run between May 16 and June 2, in keeping with the race’s traditional third-Sunday-of May date. However, they won’t have to follow the race’s famed 12K-course across The City; they may run anywhere they like.

“Although we are now moving to a virtual race once more, we look forward to keeping the Bay to Breakers tradition alive with our participants,” said John Kane, CEO of Capstone Event Group, which presents the race.

Currently registered and new participants will receive a medal, bib and bonus swag for the $49 signup fee. Those who do not want to participate in this year’s virtual run can defer registration to Bay to Breakers 2022. Deferral fees have been waived.

In 1986, with 110,000 runners, the race was listed by the Guinness Book of World Records as the world’s biggest footrace; it was surpassed by a 2010 race in the Philippines that had more than 116,000 runners.

For details, visit https://capstoneraces.com/bay-to-breakers/.

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