environment

San Francisco workers who are members of the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers are calling for The City’s retirement board system to stop investing in Chevron. <ins>(Shutterstock)</ins>

SF should step up efforts to divest from fossil fuels

Retirement fund continues to include big oil companies

 

A sign about proposed development of the bluff at Thornton State Beach in Daly City on Friday, Feb. 26, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Retreat center proposed at popular state beach

Daly City residents oppose construction on ocean bluffs

 

Aerial view of the Cargill salt ponds near Redwood City. (Shutterstock)

U.S. EPA drops challenge of Redwood City salt ponds’ protection under Clean Water Act

By Joe Dworetzky Bay City News Foundation The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency…

 

The Tuolumne River is a major source of water for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. (Shutterstock)

The SFPUC is tarnishing SF’s record as an environmental leader

By Bill Martin and Hunter Cutting San Francisco has long been an…

The Tuolumne River is a major source of water for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. (Shutterstock)
While health officials say COVID-19 isn’t spread through the use of bulk foods and reusable containers, there continues to be a reliance on wasteful disposables. (Shutterstock)

Bulk shopping is back, and that’s a good thing

Self-service is safe, but sustainability still elusive during pandemic

While health officials say COVID-19 isn’t spread through the use of bulk foods and reusable containers, there continues to be a reliance on wasteful disposables. (Shutterstock)
A drop in salmon in the Tuolumne River in 2020 is cause for concern.<ins> (Shutterstock)</ins>

Salmon dwindling while SFPUC fiddling

Decreasing numbers in Tuolumne demand science-based solutions

A drop in salmon in the Tuolumne River in 2020 is cause for concern.<ins> (Shutterstock)</ins>
State Sen. Scott Wiener hopes to make businesses disclose their carbon footprint. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Wiener bill would require corporations to report and cut down carbon emissions

Andrew Sheeler The Sacramento Bee Large California corporations would be required to…

State Sen. Scott Wiener hopes to make businesses disclose their carbon footprint. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Zero Grocery is among the Bay Area organizations delivering groceries in plastic-free packaging. (Screenshot)

Bye Trump, hello hope: SF can show US what’s possible

City’s climate efforts will shine under new administration

Zero Grocery is among the Bay Area organizations delivering groceries in plastic-free packaging. (Screenshot)
Residents of Treasure Island report serious health concerns that may be associated with the area’s toxic environment.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>

The safety of Treasure Island residents must be addressed

SF needs to step up to improve health of low-income dwellers

Residents of Treasure Island report serious health concerns that may be associated with the area’s toxic environment.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
The Presidio Trust, which has restored natural areas in The City, is considering reintroducing the locally extinct California quail to the urban park.<ins> (Shutterstock)</ins>

Presidio may bring California quail back to San Francisco

Residents can create conditions that would allow charismatic bird to thrive

The Presidio Trust, which has restored natural areas in The City, is considering reintroducing the locally extinct California quail to the urban park.<ins> (Shutterstock)</ins>
Sea turtles and other marine wildlife, sadly, are eating plastic bottles. (Courtesy Rich Carey/Shutterstock)

As plastic pollution wreaks havoc, should SF think bigger?

Newly elected Supervisor Connie Chan is ready to take on plastic industry

Sea turtles and other marine wildlife, sadly, are eating plastic bottles. (Courtesy Rich Carey/Shutterstock)
Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>

Changes in leadership at SFPUC spark concern, hope for future water policy

Will agency’s new commissioner continue to support Big Ag?

Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>
Clockwise, from top left, Manny Yekutiel and candidates Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock appeared in a virtual event dedicated to electing green Democrats to Georgia’s seats in the U.S. Senate. (Screenshot)

A green Georgia on our minds

San Franciscans can mobilize to help elect Democrats Warnock, Ossoff to Senate

Clockwise, from top left, Manny Yekutiel and candidates Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock appeared in a virtual event dedicated to electing green Democrats to Georgia’s seats in the U.S. Senate. (Screenshot)
Tenderloin residents are finding benefits to having roads closed in the neighborhood. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>

Should there be fewer cars in the Tenderloin’s future?

The pandemic has opened San Franciscans’ eyes to new uses of urban streets

Tenderloin residents are finding benefits to having roads closed in the neighborhood. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Environmentalists are studying how the breakdown of a green mineral called olivine positively affects carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.<ins> (Shutterstock photo)</ins>

Let’s keep the climate restoration movement growing

Innovators’ and policymakers’ efforts to restore balance should be encouraged

Environmentalists are studying how the breakdown of a green mineral called olivine positively affects carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.<ins> (Shutterstock photo)</ins>
A bill signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom Monday will make it easier to win approval for projects such as protected bike lanes, pedestrian safety improvements and light rail and bus lanes. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

New law makes sustainable transit easier, faster and cheaper to implement

SB 288 will add a number of climate-friendly infrastructure projects to CEQA exemption list

A bill signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom Monday will make it easier to win approval for projects such as protected bike lanes, pedestrian safety improvements and light rail and bus lanes. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)
Bayview and Hunters Point residents and advocates are calling for city officials to help clean up their neighborhood. (Courtesy Robyn Purchia)

Green Space: Seeking environmental justice in the Bayview

Residents who can’t breathe demand cleanup, reconsideration of India Basin project

Bayview and Hunters Point residents and advocates are calling for city officials to help clean up their neighborhood. (Courtesy Robyn Purchia)
Andy Goldsworthy’s sculpture “Spire” in the Presidio is among the treasures in San Francisco parks, which benefit from private funding in addition to tax dollars. (Courtesy photo)

Green Space: Pitch in to protect a city park

Enjoy – and support — S.F.’s open spaces

Andy Goldsworthy’s sculpture “Spire” in the Presidio is among the treasures in San Francisco parks, which benefit from private funding in addition to tax dollars. (Courtesy photo)
Public access to the Peninsula Watershed is restricted to help protect water quality in the Crystal Springs Reservoir, which is part of San Francisco’s extensive water system. (Shutterstock)

Report: Proposed trail through Peninsula Watershed threatens wildlife

SFPUC project part of plans to connect 550 miles of Bay Area Ridge Trail

Public access to the Peninsula Watershed is restricted to help protect water quality in the Crystal Springs Reservoir, which is part of San Francisco’s extensive water system. (Shutterstock)
Successfully restored, San Francisco’s Crissy Field today is a wildlife habitat and natural spot that visitors and residents enjoy. (Courtesy photo)

Green Space: AB 3030 a good step toward improving natural resources

Law has support among scientists and environmentists, but some industries fear burdensome restrictions

Successfully restored, San Francisco’s Crissy Field today is a wildlife habitat and natural spot that visitors and residents enjoy. (Courtesy photo)