Oakland Raiders team owner Mark Davis walks on the field before an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions on Sunday in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Oakland Raiders team owner Mark Davis walks on the field before an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions on Sunday in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Would NFL bail out Raiders in Oakland?

Would the NFL lead the charge to build a new Oakland stadium for the Raiders?

The idea seems as far-fetched as other supposed moves to save the team, but according to a report Monday in the Sports Business Daily, the league has at least discussed building a new home for the Raiders at sites near O.co Coliseum.

“We have for several years stated: ‘Don’t put a real estate developer between the Raiders and the City,’” NFL executive vice president Eric Grubman wrote in an email to Bay Area News Group. “If there is development available, talk to the Raiders about it — or perhaps the Raiders plus [the] league.”

Raiders owner Mark Davis has said repeatedly that he wants to keep the team in Oakland. But with a Jan. 13 relocation vote set at a special meeting of NFL owners, time is running out. Davis has estimated that a new, no-frills stadium would cost $900 million in the East Bay, but more likely, the figure would be closer to the $1.3 billion spent to build Levi’s Stadium for the 49ers in Santa Clara. The league also has asked the Raiders to consider sharing Levi’s with the 49ers, but both Davis and 49ers CEO Jed York have opposed such an arrangement.

If the Raiders stayed in the Bay Area, it would clear the way for the San Diego Chargers and St. Louis Rams to relocate in one Southern California stadium.

Eric GrubmanMark DavisNFLO.co ColiseumOakland Raiders

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