Woods responders concerned about domestic violence

The ambulance crew that responded after golfer Tiger Woods crashed his SUV would not allow his wife to ride with him to the hospital because they thought it was a case of domestic violence, documents released Friday by the Florida Highway Patrol show.

But a police officer who responded said he didn't know where the crew got that information because he never heard it from anyone at the scene.

The reports also show Woods' wife, Elin, turned over two bottles of pain pills to troopers after the Nov. 27 crash outside the couple's suburban Orlando home.

Tiger Woods crashed his sport utility vehicle into a fire hydrant at 2:30 a.m., and officers found him lying in the street. The SUV had a broken window and the couple told investigators Elin Woods had broken it with a golf club so she could unlock a door and pull him out.

Tiger Woods has strenuously denied his wife ever hit him. The crash led to disclosures that he had affairs with several women.

The documents released Friday also show police tried to get a subpoena for any blood samples that might have been taken at the hospital, but the prosecutor's office denied the request.

Woods was charged with careless driving and fined $164.

He has not played competitive golf since. He made a televised apology to his wife, family and fans last month.

Elin NordegrenGolfsportsTiger Woods

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