USF's Lowhorn has unfinished business

In just two seasons at USF, forward Dior Lowhorn has compiled a résumé that would make just about any college basketball player jealous.

The 6-foot-7, 230-pounder has led the West Coast Conference in scoring in two straight seasons (20.5 points per game and 20.1 ppg), garnered a pair of first-team All-WCC honors and was a Mid-Major All-American honorable mention in 2008.

All of that success had the NBA calling and Lowhorn tested the draft waters after last season. But despite promising tryouts with various NBA teams, he decided to withdraw his name from the draft.

“I have some unfinished business here,” said Lowhorn, who averaged 6.9 rebounds per game last season.

USF coach Rex Walters, who is entering his second season, agrees.

“I thought that it was really smart of him to check things out and see the things that he needs to work on to play at that level,” said Walters, who played in the NBA from 1993-2000. “He’s doing some things even better now. ”

While the Dons don’t officially kick the season off until Friday when they host Cal Poly at 7 p.m., Lowhorn is already off and running.
In the team’s exhibition game against Cal State Monterey Bay on Saturday, Lowhorn scored 30 points. He is currently the No. 17 all-time leading scorer in USF history with 1,240 points. He needs 602 points this season, a feat he has accomplished each of the last two years, to climb into second place on the scoring list or 876 to eclipse the record holder, Bill Cartwright.

Walters knows he will have to continue to lean on Lowhorn this season.

“It’s nice to have a guy who can score from 20 to 35 to 40 points a night,” Walters said.

After transferring from St. Ignatius High School, Lowhorn was highly recruited out of Berkeley High School and began his collegiate career at Texas Tech. Lowhorn’s father, Walter, a City College of San Francisco employee, encouraged his son to play at Tech for Bobby Knight, the legendary coach and a longtime friend of ex-CCSF athletic director Brad Duggan.

“Coach Knight being old-school, my dad being old-school, it was a no-brainer for me to play for the all-time winningest coach in history,” Lowhorn said.

The San Francisco native credits Knight for teaching him how to play basketball at a high level.

“He also teaches you manhood,” Lowhorn said. “He groomed me into a tough player and a good human being.”

The world of Lubbock, Texas, however, was too far from California, and Lowhorn grew a bit homesick. After his freshman season, he opted to move home to complete his college career on the Hilltop.

And now, entering his senior season, Walters sees Lowhorn as the undisputed court leader for this young team.

“He’s not a vocal guy in meetings or in the locker room, but he’s been much more vocal on the court,”
Walters said.

Although Lowhorn identifies playing in the NBA as his “No. 1 priority,” the environmental studies major has a clear vision of life after hoops.

“I’m going to stick with basketball another 10 years; then I want to coach and teach in The City,” Lowhorn said. “I definitely want to live in San Francisco the rest of my life.”

Just Posted

Delivery companies prompt a human vs robot showdown

Two years after ban and regulations passed, companies awaiting approval of testing permits

Report: Uber and Lyft’s rise tanked wheelchair access to taxis

A new city report details the devastating drop in on-demand rides for the disability community after the rise of Uber and Lyft.

Discovery of human remains at home of missing man upsets Outer Mission neighbors

Police are investigating the disappearance of 73-year-old Benedict Ching

Google says it is ‘committed’ to helping the Punch Line stay in its home

Comedy club threatened with loss of lease, displacement after more than 40 years

Woman caught in Muni door, dragged to tracks files claim against SF

Sunset District resident suffered collapsed lung, broken ribs, spinal and pelvic fractures

Most Read