Ty Blach walks back to the mound after Eduardo Nunez fails to make an out on a sacrifice bunt by the pitcher. (Jacob C. Palmer/S.F. Examiner)

Ty Blach walks back to the mound after Eduardo Nunez fails to make an out on a sacrifice bunt by the pitcher. (Jacob C. Palmer/S.F. Examiner)

Ty Blach’s bid for a quality night against the Royals derailed in the sixth

AT&T PARK — Ty Blach was well on his way to a quality start.

The San Francisco Giants lefty cruised into the sixth inning without giving up much hard contact to the Kansas City Royals. Then, Blach’s luck turned.

“It’s a shame because Ty really threw the ball well, he really did,” Bruce Bochy said.

A leadoff single by Lorenzo Cain was followed by a slap-single and an infield hit to load the bases. Alcides Escobar then drove a ball toward the line in right field. Hunter Pence tried to make a sliding catch but ended up nowhere near making the play and all three runners scored.

With how the Giants offense has been performing this year, that was more than enough to ensure a win for the visitors, 8-1. It was the 17th time this season San Francisco was limited to one run or fewer, the worst such mark in baseball.

Blach left the game with the bases loaded and Cory Gearrin allowed the Royals to clear them on a triple and a single to the first two batters he faced.

So, what appeared to be Blach’s seventh quality start ended up being the third time he’s allowed five or more earned runs in an outing.

On the other side, Kansas City starter Jason Vargas pitched seven innings, allowing one run on five hits and a walk. He struck out six as the San Francisco hitters struggled to square up his pitches.

The loss drops the Giants to 26-40 on the season and 14-17 at home. They sit 14.5 games behind the Colorado Rockies in the standings.

Strickland awaits his fate

Before the game, Hunter Strickland had a hearing with Major League Baseball about his pending suspension for throwing at Washington Nationals star Bryce Harper on Memorial Day.

The Giants were hoping to know the determination of Joe Torre, the league’s top cop, before the game. But with that not being resolved in time, Bruce Bochy decided to throw Strickland before he inevitably is shut down for a stretch of time.

When the punishment comes down, the Giants will remain a pitcher short as Bochy said he doesn’t expect to make a roster move to compensate for Strickland being removed from contention.

Bruce Bochyconor gillaspieKansas City RoyalsMLBSan Francisco Giantsty blach

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