Tim Lincecum will be back in Major League Baseball in 2018, but it won't be with the San Francisco Giants. (Courtesy rocor/Flickr)

Tim Lincecum will be back in Major League Baseball in 2018, but it won't be with the San Francisco Giants. (Courtesy rocor/Flickr)

Tim Lincecum is returning to the big leagues, but not to the Giants

The dream of Tim Lincecum returning to the San Francisco Giants for a reunion tour has been deferred.

The two-time Cy Young winner reportedly has an offer for a guaranteed contract, and according to Grant Brisbee of SB Nation, it isn’t from the Giants.

RELATED NEWS: Tim Lincecum deserves another shot, to go out on his terms

Lincecum’s last go-round in Major League Baseball didn’t go particularly well. He carried a 9.16 ERA across 38.1 innings for the Los Angeles Angels in 2016.

He sat out last season and apparently spent most of his time in the weight room.

According to Jon Heyman, Lincecum was hitting 90 to 93 mph on the radar gun during his showcase last week in Seattle. That’s a notable uptick from the 88.9 mph he was averaging on his fastball when he was with the Angels.

The exciting righty will be back in action in 2018, but it remains unclear who he will be throwing for. Per MLB Trade Rumors, the other teams to attend his showcase were: The Texas Rangers, Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers, Minnesota Twins, Detroit Tigers, Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, Milwaukee Brewers, San Diego Padres, Atlanta Braves, Seattle Mariners and St. Louis Cardinals.

Add the Yankees to the list of teams that won’t sign Lincecum. But either way, he’ll get an opportunity to rebuild a once-amazing career.

Contact Jacob C. Palmer at jpalmer@sfexaminer.com or on Twitter, @jacobc_palmer.San Francisco GiantsTim Lincecum

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