Tag Heuer keeps Tiger on board

Swiss watch maker Tag Heuer said Monday it will continue its association with Tiger Woods despite the golfer's alleged infidelities.

Company spokeswoman Mariam Sylla said the sponsorship is unchanged because Woods remains the world's best golfer and Tag Heuer does not care about his private life.

“We will continue,” Sylla told The Associated Press. “He's the best in his domain.

“We respect his performance in the sport,” she said, adding that Woods' personal life is “not our business.”

Tag Heuer has been sponsoring Woods since 2002. Financial details of the agreement have not been announced.

Tag Heuer's comment came a day after global consulting firm Accenture PLC became the first major sponsor to announce it was cutting ties with Woods.

Woods announced Friday he is taking an indefinite leave from golf to work on his marriage after allegations of infidelity surfaced in recent weeks.

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