Michael Zito/AP file photoThe 49ers have not seen enough of tight end Vernon Davis

Michael Zito/AP file photoThe 49ers have not seen enough of tight end Vernon Davis

Stock in 49ers’ Vernon Davis has taken a nosedive

Buyer's remorse.

That's what anyone who purchased stock in Vernon Davis is feeling right about now.

Davis himself, however, is probably feeling pretty good on that front.

In case you missed it, during the offseason, Davis signed an unprecedented agreement with a group called Fantex, a San Francisco company that paid Davis $4 million in exchange for 10 percent of all future earnings tied to his football career.

Emphasis “all.”

That means 10 percent of anything he's paid by the team for which he plays, anything he makes from endorsing a particular product, any cut he might take as part of the NFL Players Association's deal with the NFL regarding merchandise, etc.

That also means that for Fantex to make 1 cent on the deal, Davis' total future earnings from that point forward has to be at least $40 million.

Yeah, buyer's remorse pretty much covers it. Now on the wrong side of 30 years old — closing in on ancient for an NFL skill-position player — and in the middle of a downright horrible season, Davis will be lucky if he makes one cent outside his playing contracts.

Having failed miserably in his attempt to force the Niners to sign him to an extension by holding out, Davis is now in the second-to-last year of his current deal. These last two years count against the aforementioned $40 million — for a total of $9.05 million.

If you're the Niners right now, you're not exactly hot to jump on that requested extension. And should Davis hit free agency before the 2016 season, you can bet there won't be many teams out there willing to throw him any more than a two-or three-year deal, with guaranteed money probably sitting somewhere under the $10 million mark.

Or let's be generous and make that $15 million. It'll probably never happen, but just play along. Just for fun.

That takes Davis' football earnings to $25 million. Still $15 million short of the Fantex break-even point.

And where exactly will that $15 million come from? Davis obviously sold Fantex on the notion that all that brand-building work Davis did during the offseason would make him a Madison Avenue darling. A sought-after pitch man. After all, Davis is handsome, well-spoken, a Renaissance man of sorts, interested in art and fashion … easy sell, right?

Uh, no. Hubris is, in fact, an extremely hard sell, and that's the only thing Davis has brought to the table since he went on his big media tour and repeatedly stuck his foot in his mouth during his ill-advised holdout.

Now he's underperforming, and making poorly veiled references to the failures of his quarterback, the Niners' offensive coordinator, and anything else other than what's likely the real problem: Vernon Davis.

Davis drops passes like Taylor Swift drops pop-star boyfriends. Or is it the other way around? With Swift, that is. Passes don't drop Davis. Davis drops passes. A lot of them.

He's also dropping his own stock price. A few more games of this, and it will be a penny stock.

But not for Vernon. He got $4 million in cash. Just another ridiculous twist on this ridiculous Niners season.

FantexMychael UrbanSan Francisco 49ersVernon Davis

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