Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) handles the ball against the New Orleans Pelicans at Oracle Arena during Game 2 of the Western Semifinals in Oakland, California, on May 1, 2018. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Stephen Curry is the MVP already

When it comes to the Golden State Warriors, the nation seems more willing to discuss Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson’s upcoming free agency, even considering the fact that this team is attempting to three-peat and win their fourth title in five seasons.  

All these lazy media members and fans trying to tear apart this dynasty have been comical, but the most bothersome thing is the disrespect towards Stephen Curry.

The NBA world knows Curry is really good — if not great — but is he one of the top three players in the league? I mean, he is a two-time Most Valuable Player and the only player in the history of the league to win the award unanimously.

The talking heads are in love with James Harden’s ball-hogging style and Russell Westbrook’s triple-doubles, despite the Oklahoma City Thunder being bounced in the first round of the playoffs the previous two seasons.

For me, it’s disrespectful for Curry to not be in the conversation for the MVP award. Sure, we’re a week into the season, but it just feels like we’re heading that way. Voter fatigue? No love due to Kevin Durant being on the same team? That’s possible, but that’s also shortsighted approach.

Curry has opened up the 2018-19 season on fire, shooting 53 percent while making nearly six three-pointers a night. He’s averaging 30.5 points through the first four games, but it’s the way he’s moving and the explosiveness he’s displaying that clinches it.

The three-time champ looks primed to have the best season of his career. Per Elias Sports, Curry’s 22 three-pointers through the first four games of the season are a new NBA record for most threes through the first four games. Know who held the previous record? It was Curry, who had 21 in 2015-16.

After an injury-riddled 2017-18 where he missed 37 games — including the first six postseason games — Curry put up respectable numbers, but the time he missed somehow made him an afterthought in the “best player of the world” conversation.

I don’t think that’ll be the case this season. Curry looks like he’s on cruise control, playing at a tempo that reminds me of smooth jazz.

According to his personal trainer, Brandon Payne, Curry had one of the best offseasons of his career. Curry and head coach Steve Kerr echoed those same sentiments.

That’s scary. NBA teams should be petrified by the man responsible for “breaking” basketball.

Why is Curry so under-appreciated and underrated? I don’t think we’ll ever know. Does it bother Curry that he’s not mentioned amongst the game’s greats? Personally, I think it does, but he’ll never say so publicly.

In the Bay Area, Curry will be mentioned along with the likes of Joe Montana, Rickey Henderson, and Jerry Rice. He’s beloved here like no other athlete who’s played in this region.

But nationally, will Curry get the respect that a two-time MVP deserves? Time will tell, but if the first four games prove anything, it’s that he’ll remind the basketball world just how great is, catapulting him into the MVP and best player in the world conversation.

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