Steinmetz: Was Baron victim of All-Star vendettas?

The Warriors have had a lot going on in the past few days.

Baron Davis, having perhaps his finest season in the NBA, wasn’t selected for the Western Conference All-Star team. Jason Richardson, the former face of the franchise, returned Friday to Oracle Arena as a member of the Charlotte Bobcats. And just the other day, coach Don Nelson announced that newly signed Chris Webber would start.

Some quick thoughts on each of the three:

» I wouldn’t go so far as to say Davis got hosed, but I do think the Western Conference coaches blew it — and some of them probably meant to. Is Portland’s Brandon Roy deserving of making the All-Star team? Yes, he is. But he is less deserving than Davis. Ditto for New OrleansDavid West.

A handful of coaches left Davis off their ballots likely for personal reasons rather than basketball ones. I can’t imagine Byron Scott, Mike Dunleavy Sr. or George Karl voting for Davis.

All three of those guys could claim some kind of beef with Davis or the Warriors in general (Scott and Davis feuded in New Orleans; Dunleavy watched his son get hammered by Bay Area fans; and Karl had a bad experience with Davis on Team USA).

It might be unfair that Davis didn’t make the team, but it’s not that hard to figure out why.

» It was nice to be reminded again what a good guy Richardson is. He was traded from one of the most exciting teams in the league to one of the most depressing, yet he came back last weekend with a smile and a positive vibe.

Richardson is a pro’s pro, and seeing and hearing Warriors fans give him a standing ovation before the game was a nice touch.

It’s tough to see J-Rich on another team, particularly a bad one. But look on the bright side — if the recent past is any indication, Richardson will finish his career with the Warriors.

» Most people are calling the Webber signing a low-risk move. But it’s a lot more risky now that Nelson made Webber a starter. When word of the Warriors’ interest in Webber surfaced, conventional wisdom was that he would play 10 to 15 minutes a game and probably be the backup center.

It’s clear that’s not the case. Webber is going to play more than that, which means we’ll need to keep an eye on Al Harrington and Matt Barnes.

Webber figures to cut into their minutes and the very real result could be that Harrington and Barnes become less effective. Not saying it’s going to happen, just something to pay attention to.

The Warriors need Harrington and Barnes to pitch in for them to be at their best. It might be more difficult for them to do that with less playing time.

Matt Steinmetz is the NBA insider for Warriors telecasts on Fox Sports Net.

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