Steinmetz: Warriors’ offseason filled with hits, misses

It was a busy offseason for the Warriors — and there still could be a move or two before training camp begins in October.

For the most part, the heavy lifting is done, though, which means it’s time to assess each and every move of the Warriors’ offseason thus far:

Draft Anthony Randolph and Richard Hendrix: Randolph, selected at No. 14 overall, has the look of something special. By all appearances, it seems like a great pick at that number. As for Hendrix, if he makes the team, it’s another good pick. Grade: A

Baron Davis opts out and signs with the Los Angeles Clippers: Davis caught the Warriors by surprise by leaving without warning and it put them in a position of weakness as free agency opened. Simply put, the Warriors didn’t believe for one moment Davis was going to walk away from $17.8 million … and he did. Grade: F

Sign Corey Maggette: Reacting quickly — although likely too quickly — the Warriors signed Maggette to a five-year, $50 million contract. Replacing Davis’ scoring was a must, but that’s a lot of money for a one-dimensional player. Grade: D

Sign Ronny Turiaf: The Warriors addressed their lack of interior toughness by signing Turiaf to a four-year contract worth $17 million. That’s not bad and Turiaf will no doubt help. But don’t expect him to be a difference-maker or a factor at the offensive end. He’s here to defend, rebound and take fouls. Grade: B-minus

Acquire Marcus Williams for a protected pick: It may have been Chris Mullin’s best move of the offseason. While the names of higher-priced point guards were being thrown around — Kirk Hinrich, Carlos Arroyo, Jannero Pargo and Luke Ridnour — the Warriors instead found Williams lingering on the New Jersey Nets’ bench. There is no doubt Williams is going to benefit from a change of scenery. And he costs hardly anything. Here’s predicting he plays more of a role than most anyone believes. Grade: A

Match offer to Kelenna Azubuike: The Warriors were poised to allow Azubuike to go to the Clippers and sign Maurice Evans for less money. But Evans ended up going to Atlanta and the Warriors ended up matching L.A.’s three-year, $9 million offer. Not the end of the world, but getting Evans for less would have been better. Grade: C-plus

Re-sign Monta Ellis: The Warriors brought Ellis back into the fold for six years and $66 million. It’s a lot of money, but very much in line with what other comparable free agents received this summer. All in all, nothing to complain about. Grade: B

Re-sign Andris Biedrins: The Warriors brought Biedrins back for six years and between $9 million and $10 million a year. Again, that’s a lot of money, but it’s the going rate for competent centers these days. All in all, a solid signing. Grade: B-plus

Overall grade: C. The Warriors have done some nice things this offseason, such as re-signing their young core of Ellis and Biedrins and addressing the point guard situation. But losing Davis and signing Maggette for $10 million per season are noteworthy blemishes to an up-and-down summer.

Matt Steinmetz is the NBA insider for Warriors telecasts on Comcast SportsNet Bay Area.

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