Sports briefs: Vick faces more charges

Michael Vick’s legal problems just got a little bit trickier. The suspended Atlanta Falcons quarterback was slapped by a Surry County grand jury with two state charges related to his federal dogfighting case, in which he has already entered a plea agreement. The Virginia charges against Vick and his three co-defendants are beating or killing or causing dogs to fight other dogs and engaging in or promoting dogfighting, which are felonies and would lead to additional prison time on top of whatever Vick receives in his his sentencing Dec. 10. Each charge carries a maximum of five years in prison. Vick’s lawyers said they will fight the state case, arguing that he can’t be convicted twice of the same crime. The grand jury refused to indict Vick and two of the other co-defendents on 27 other charges, which could have netted an additional 40 years in prison.

NINERS CUT WILLIAMS, INK LEWIS

If it seems like Michael Lewis is all over the field for the Niners, it is because there are now two of them on the roster. Lewis, a receiver and kick returner who gained notoriety for driving a beer truck before playing for the New Orleans Saints, was signed by the 49ers, who cut second-year receiver-returner Brandon Williams. The other Michael Lewis is a starting safety.

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