Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green (23) reacts after being called for a technical foul against the San Antonio Spurs at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on October 25, 2016. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Sluggish Warriors show that superteams even lose great

OK, Dubs Nation, you can pick your jaw off the floor now.

The Warriors lost the much-hyped debut of the Kevin Durant era on Tuesday night, and San Antonio Spurs paddled them good. From poor decisions to lousy fundamentals to half-hearted efforts, the homies left no brick unturned, all right.

And Balls is here to tell you the 129-100 stinker was absolutely the best thing that could happen to coach Steve Kerr and his team.

“This isn’t the end of the world,” Klay Thompson said afterward. “It’s far from it. … In the long run, this will benefit us. It’s a long season, and not everything is going to be perfect from the jump. I expect us to be better on Friday night.”

Ding-ding-ding-ding-ding!

See, the Warriors will be judged on how they finish the season, not start it. Whether they win 50-something or 60-something or 70-something games in the regular season won’t mean diddly. All that matters is that they’re healthy and in sync come playoff time.

Unlike last season, when the Warriors opened with a ridiculous 24 victories in a row, there will be no such distraction this time. Now, Kerr and his team can focus on the details, on how to maximize their embarrassment of riches, not some NBA record. Heck, the players may even listen to him for a few days.

This is a different season and Warriors team. Six new faces are on the roster, and the turnover makes for a lot of questions. How does the rotation of Durant, Thompson, Stephen Curry and Draymond Green work best? The bench? Where do newbies Zaza Pachulia, JaVale McGee and David West fit in? How ’bout kids Kevon Looney and Patrick McCaw, if they fit in at all?

It will take days to find the answers. More likely, weeks. If the Warriors don’t get right before the All-Star break, well, they’ve got problems then. For now, all they’ve got is one loss. And what a great loss it was.

ADDED BONUS: Now, we won’t have to hear the critics whine about how the Warriors destroyed the competitive balance of the league. Well, for a few days at least.

We also get to hear TNT loose cannon Charles Barkley say even more dumb things like how Thompson is a better all-around player than Durant. And how the Warriors won’t win it all, because — all together now — they shoot too many jump shots.

ADDED BONUS: Now we won’t have to hear the critics whine about how the Warriors destroyed the competitive balance of the league. Well, for a few days at least.

We also get to hear TNT loose cannon Charles Barkley say even more dumb things like how Thompson is a better all-around player than Durant. And the Warriors won’t win it all, because all together now, they shoot too many jump shots.

PRICE OF DURANT: Check that. After further review, there may be a big concern.

Hel-looo, Zaza?

Pachulia is not a stiff, especially when his team has the ball. But he’s an inch shorter, a year older and not nearly as physical or active as Andrew Bogut at the other end. And that’s the end where the Warriors need their bigs to scrap and claw like crazy, because 1) they’re a bit undersized up front, and 2) opponents are sure to attack their most obvious (only?) weakness.

A season ago, the Warriors allowed just 99 points per 100 possessions while Bogut was on the court. Pachulia (104) was worse than back-ups McGee (103) and Anderson Varejao (102) in that regard. Green (100) could spend even more time in the middle, but teams don’t win championships with 6-foot-7 centers any more.

General manager Bob Myers, start your Rolodex …

PRICE OF DURANT: Check that. After further review, there may be a big concern.

Hel-looo, Zaza?

Pachulia is not a stiff, especially when his team has the ball. But he’s an inch shorter, a year older and not nearly as physical or active as Andrew Bogut at the other end. And that’s the end where the Warriors need their bigs to scrap and claw like crazy, because 1) they’re a bit undersized up front, and 2) opponents are sure to attack their most obvious (only?) weakness.

A season ago, the Warriors allowed just 99 points per 100 possessions while Bogut was on the court. Pachulia (104) was worse than back-ups McGee (103) and Anderson Varejao (102) in that regard. Green (100) could spend even more time in the middle, but teams don’t win championships with 6-foot-7 centers any more.

GREAT MINDS DISS ALIKE: One Warrior likened the outcome to “a slap in the face.”

Another Warrior said it was “a little slap in the face.”

Hey, who says Durant and Curry aren’t on the same page already?

HISTORY LESSON: If anybody can relate to the stunner, Warriors consultant Jerry West is the one.

In 1968, the Los Angeles Lakers added Wilt Chamberlain to a Hall of Fame lineup that included West in the backcourt and Elgin Baylor on the wing. Couldn’t lose, many said.

Then, the Lakers went to Philadelphia, where the 76ers toasted them by 18 points in the season opener. They dropped three of their first four games, in fact.

The Lakers regrouped to win 55 games in the regular season and the Western Conference title before they gagged in Game 7 of the NBA Finals. Since the Warriors got their choke out of the way last spring, consider the blowout to be a good omen.

JUST SAYIN’: The next time we see the Spurs and Warriors at Oracle Arena will be the Western Conference finals.

JUST SAYIN’ SOME MORE: The Spurs’ Kawhi Leonard looks like the same great player but in a different body. Strange, but he didn’t hang out with David Ortiz in the offseason, either.

MISTAKEN IDENTITY: One area where the Warriors should have it all over the Spurs is off the bench, except they were outscored 54-16 there.

So who was that Jonathon Simmons guy? And why was he allowed to swat away a Curry shot from behind and posterize McGee on a dunk, not to mention score a career-high 20 points?

Simmons is an undrafted 27-year-old guard who spent most of last season as the butt end of coach Gregg Popovich insults. If he’s anything close to what he was in the opener, the Warriors may have some company in the conference after all, but Balls ain’t buyin’ that one.

BUSINESS AS USUAL: Andre Iguodala was minus-28, but it could have been worse. That was his only his points differential, not the Dow Jones average.

THE LIST: Can’t-miss picks against the spread in Week 8 of the NFL season …

Arizona Cardinals (+3) at Carolina Panthers.

Minnesota Vikings at Chicago Bears (+6 1/2).

Washington Redskins at Cincinnati Bengals (-3).

Last week: 2-1. Season: 9-12 (.429).

Got an opinion? A gripe? A compliment? A compliment?! Send them to pladd@aol.com, and who knows, you may get your name in the paper before long.

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