Serra, Sacred Heart to meet in WCAL battle

After a heart-wrenching loss on the road against Archbishop Mitty in its West Catholic Athletic League opener last week, a single question stands out for Sacred Heart Cathedral — Will the Irish be able to bounce back?

Trailing 26-7 to Mitty in the second quarter, the Irish (3-1, 0-1) battled back and cut the lead to 33-32 on a last-second drive in the fourth quarter, but fullback Harry Libarle’s inside run came up just short on the following two-point conversion and the Irish left with a loss.

“I know they’re going to come back,” said Sacred Heart Cathedral coach John Lee after the loss. “They could have quit at 26-7 and they didn’t. We’re gonna get ’em.”

It may not get any easier for the Irish, who will host Serra (2-2, 0-1) on Saturday at Kezar Stadium.

Don’t let Serra’s record fool you, the Padres only two losses, albeit lopsided, came to Bay Area powers De La Salle and Valley Christian.

“There’s still a lot of football to play, but those two teams could arguably be representing Northern California in state title games,” said Serra coach Patrick Walsh.

Still, Walsh will not be taking the Irish lightly, especially their offense, led by senior quarterback Sean Murphy and junior running back Valentino Miles.

“I’m impressed with their quarterback,” Walsh said. “He leads the offense well, he’s an accurate passer and makes plays with his legs. He stood out the most on film.”

The Padres defense has been suspect in their two losses, allowing 45 points to De La Salle and 52 to Valley Christian last week.

“We have 10 new starters on defense and we’re having trouble tackling great athletes,” Walsh said. “Those issues are not going away in this league. They have a great running back in Miles and some great receivers. The Irish are scary this year.”

Lee also highlighted defense as a key, specifically stopping the Padres’ double-wing offense.

“We definitely have to stop their offense,” Lee said. “They run that tight double-wing and it’s tough to stop. They’re a good team and we’re going to give them the proper amount of respect. In this league, on any given day you can lose to any team.”

The loss against Mitty could hurt the Irish’s playoff chances if they can’t pick up a few key wins in the WCAL, but Lee feels his team will be ready perform.

“They reacted very positively [to the Mitty loss],” Lee said. “We can’t fall in love with ourselves and there is no arrogance or cockiness. They did not like the way [the loss] felt.”

Preps sports coverage provided in partnership by The San Francisco Examiner and www.SanFranPreps.com

John LeePrep SportssportsSt. Ignatius

Just Posted

Cyclists and runners move along JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park near the de Young Museum and the Music Concourse on Tuesday, May 11, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Your chance to weigh in: Should JFK remain closed to cars?

City proposes a host of mobility improvements for Golden Gate Park

A man walks past the main entrance to the Hotel Whitcomb at Eighth and Market streets on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Closing hotels could disconnect hundreds from critical health care services

‘That baseline of humanity and dignity goes a long way’

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

The remnants of trees burned by the Dixie Fire near Antelope Lake, Calif., on Friday, Sept. 3, 2021. (Christian Monterrosa/The New York Times)
California’s wildfires invisible effect: high carbon dioxide emissions

This summer California fires emitted twice as much CO2 as last year

Latinos are dying at a lower rate than white and Black people in California. However, Latinos have had the sharpest increase in the death rate in the last month, rising from 2.4 deaths per 100,000 people in August to 4 per 100,000 in September. (iStock)
Who’s dying in California from COVID-19?

In recent months, those who are dying are younger

Most Read