Serena’s next obstacle: Sharapova, who is called poor sport

Serena Williams of the United States celebrates winning the singles match against Victoria Azarenka of Belarus, at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, Tuesday July 7, 2015. Williams won 3-6, 6-2, 6-3.  (Pavel Golovkin/AP Photo)

Serena Williams of the United States celebrates winning the singles match against Victoria Azarenka of Belarus, at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, Tuesday July 7, 2015. Williams won 3-6, 6-2, 6-3. (Pavel Golovkin/AP Photo)

LONDON — Even as Serena Williams piled up aces and groundstroke winners from all angles, even as she stormed through seven games in a row and 10 of the last 13 in yet another comeback, her Wimbledon quarterfinal against Victoria Azarenka never felt like a runaway.

That’s because Azarenka, a two-time major champion and former No. 1 in her own right, was playing spectacular tennis, too, nearly the equal of Williams in every facet.

Nearly.

For when Williams finds her best game, she becomes unbeatable. And for her past 26 Grand Slam matches she is, indeed, unbeaten. Erasing an early deficit at Centre Court, Williams got past Azarenka 3-6, 6-2, 6-3 Tuesday with the help of 17 aces and a remarkable ratio of 46 winners to 12 unforced errors.

“It’s been up and down, up and down, but somehow I’m still alive. I don’t know how,” said Williams, who twice was two points from losing to Britain’s Heather Watson in the third round and is now 14-0 in three-setters and 37-1 overall in 2015. “So we’ll see what happens, but I’m just happy to still be here.”

She is closing in on a fourth consecutive major title for a self-styled Serena Slam, which she already accomplished in 2002-03. Pull that off, and Williams also will have the third leg of a calendar-year Grand Slam and go to the U.S. Open with a chance to become the first player since Steffi Graf in 1988 to win all four major trophies in one season.

“I haven’t seen her play like this, honestly,” said Azarenka, who has lost 17 of 20 matches against Williams and all 10 meetings at majors, including after leading by a set and a break at the French Open in May.

In Thursday’s semifinals, No. 1 Williams faces her longtime rival, No. 4 Maria Sharapova, who beat unseeded American CoCo Vandeweghe 6-3, 6-7 (3), 6-2. The other semifinal has No. 13 Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland against No. 20 Garbine Muguruza of Spain.

Williams is 17-2 against Sharapova, including 16 straight victories. But one of Sharapova’s wins came at Wimbledon, in the 2004 final, when at age 17 she stunned Williams for the first of her five Grand Slam titles.

“Definitely no secrets between each other’s games,” Sharapova said.

Williams, whose major trophy count is at 20, said of the matchup: “I look forward to it.”

Here was the scouting report from Williams’ coach, Patrick Mouratoglou: “If she plays like today, I don’t think anyone can compete.”

Pick an adjective for Williams-Azarenka. Intense. Riveting. Entertaining. Sublime. For 2 hours, 4 minutes on a windy, cloudy day, that’s what this was. Both hit the ball hard. Both covered the court from corner to corner.

“We put on a great show,” Azarenka said.

Williams was too good in the late going. From 2-all in the second set, Williams went about 45 minutes without dropping a game, taking that set and going ahead 3-0 in the third. Azarenka wouldn’t concede, and even had a break point in the final game. Williams erased that with an ace, one of a half-dozen in her final two service games.

“I mean,” the 33-year-old American said, “that’s my game on grass — just aces.”

It took 2 hours, 46 minutes for Sharapova to subdue Vandeweghe, who had never previously progressed past the third round at a major but made the most of her appearance on the biggest stage in the game. The 23-year-old American played to the Wimbledon patrons and won them over.

After the match, Vandeweghe accused Sharapova of poor sportsmanship for continuously moving around after Vandeweghe had started her service motion and said she twice talked to the umpire about it during the match.

“She was moving around in the middle of my motion on my second serve,” Vandeweghe said. “[The umpire] said she didn’t believe she was doing it during the motion. I strongly disagreed. Toward the later end of the second set, I said if she has a problem speaking to Maria, if she’s too scared to do it, I had no problem speaking to her.”

She said the umpire did not say anything to Sharapova, and Vandeweghe said she also did not address Sharapova directly during the match.

“What I experienced, what I felt from her moving around in between my serving motion was not, I don’t think, sportsmanlike, in my opinion,” Vandeweghe said. “I try to play as fair as I can. You know, when I felt like it wasn’t being reciprocated, that’s when I spoke with the umpire for her to deal with.”

Sharapova said she was unaware there were any issues during the match and that she was never told anything by the umpire or Vandeweghe.

“I mean, it is what it is,” Sharapova said when told of Vandeweghe’s accusations. “What she said, I’m not going to argue against her words.”

Sharapova served for the match at 5-4 in the second set but couldn’t close it out. When Vandeweghe won four straight points to take the second-set tiebreaker, it was the first time that Sharapova had dropped a set all tournament.

Soaking it all in during her first Grand Slam quarterfinal — it was Sharapova’s 23rd — Vandeweghe repeatedly waved her arms after significant points, motioning to spectators to make more noise and be less, well, genteel.

“I relished it pretty well. I enjoyed my experience. I enjoyed the crowd out there,” said Vandeweghe, whose grandfather and uncle Kiki were NBA players and grandmother was a Miss America. “I didn’t enjoy the result too much.”

That’s because Sharapova, so passive in the second set, turned it on at the end, claiming the final three games.Maria SharapovaSerena WilliamstennisVictoria AzarenkaWimbledon

Just Posted

A collaborative workspace for a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) in Coordinape is pictured at a recent blockchain meet up at Atlas Cafe. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Business without bosses: San Francisco innovators battle bureaucracy with blockchain

‘The next generation will work for three DAOs at the same time’

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
Plan Bay Area 2050: Analyzing an extensive regional plan that covers the next 30 years

Here are the big ticket proposals in the $1.4 trillion proposal

Pregnant women are in the high-risk category currently prioritized for booster shots in San Francisco. (Unai Huizi/Shutterstock)
What pregnant women need to know about COVID and booster shots

Inoculations for immunosuppressed individuals are recommended in the second trimester

Examiner reporter Ben Schneider drives an Arcimoto Fun Utility Vehicle along Beach Street in Fisherman’s Wharf on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Could San Francisco’s tiny tourist cruisers become the cars of the future?

‘Fun Utility Vehicles’ have arrived in The City

Most Read