San Mateo High School golfer sets sights on state title

San Mateo High School golfer Aman Sangha may only be a sophomore, but already she has accomplished more than most high school golfers achieve in four years.

Sangha finished in a tie for fourth at 4-over-par 77 at last week’s NCGA/CIF Girls NorCal Championship to qualify for the state tournament for the second year in a row, winning the Peninsula Athletic League Championship each time.

Last year, she became the first girls’ golfer in school history to claim the PAL championship. Now back-to-back titles have earned high praise from coach Jimmy Ikeda.

When asked whether a pro career was in Sangha’s future, Ikeda said the potential was there.

“That’s the million dollar question, right?” he said. “I think if she continues to progress, she has the temperament, she has the game, it’s just a matter of putting it all together. As she grows and gets older, she’s going to mature and she’s going to get stronger. In my opinion, she’s the best I’ve ever seen in terms of a high school golfer.”

A knack for the game seems to run in the family. Ikeda said Sangha has two younger sisters right behind her who could be on the same path.

It’s a path that has seemingly comes naturally to the young star.

“She’s just a very consistent player who works really hard at the game,” Ikeda said. “She’s very accurate. It’s a combination of things. Her attitude is great, her work ethic’s wonderful, she just has a knack for the game.”

The CIF Girls’ State Championship will begin Wednesday at Quail Lodge Golf Course in Carmel. Sangha will look to improve on last year’s performance in the tournament when she shot a 91.

State prep golf championship

WHEN: Wednesday

WHERE: Quail Lodge Golf Course, Carmel

WHO: San Mateo golfer Aman Sangha will be part of the 54-player field

INFO: www.cifstate.orgGolf

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