Jimmy Garoppolo was all smiles when he faced questions after signing the NFL’s richest contract.  Now, he has his left tackle in Mike McGlinchey as the 49ers head into training camp. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Jimmy Garoppolo was all smiles when he faced questions after signing the NFL’s richest contract. Now, he has his left tackle in Mike McGlinchey as the 49ers head into training camp. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

San Francisco 49ers sign draft pick Mike McGlinchey

The San Francisco 49ers today announced that they have signed ninth-overall draft pick Mike McGlinchey to a four-year deal.

The 6-foot-8, 315-pound offensive tackle out of Notre Dame appeared in 51 games (39 starts) in five years with the Irish. The under-the-radar tackle could be a cornerstone for years to come, and figures to be one of Jimmy Garoppolo’s best protectors.

The 49ers have not had great success developing offensive line talent, with Joshua Garnett, Marcus Martin and Trent Brown failing to live up to expectations, so McGlinchey’s development will be closely watched, if San Francisco figures on giving their new franchise quarterback any kind of on-field security. McGlinchey needs to work on his strength level, but with training camp starting on July 26, that will soon be fixed by an NFL training regimen.

The 23-year old Philadelphia native is athletic with long arms — something head coach Kyle Shanahan wants in his offensive linemen. Drafting a future left tackle early allowed the 49ers salary cap flexibility for the duration of his rookie deal.

BusinessInsider estimated the total contract value for McGlinchey at $18,596,442, and his signing bonus at $11,595,085.

As a senior at Notre Dame in 2017, McGlinchey was named a team captain and earned First-Team All-America honors from the Associated Press, the Football Writers Association of America, the American Football Coaches Association, USA Today and Sports Illustrated.

Starting all 13 games for the Irish, he was part of an offensive line that won the Joe Moore Award, given to the nation’s most outstanding offensive line. Notre Dame averaged 269.3 rushing yards per game, ranking seventh in the Football Bowl Subdivision.

As a junior, he earned Second-Team All-America honors from the Associated Press, was a team captain and started all 12 games at left tackle. That Irish offensive line averaged 417.6 rushing yards per game. In 2015, he started all 13 games at right tackle and was part of an offensive line that helped Notre Dame average 5.63 yards per rushing attempt, ranking ninth in the FBS.

As a freshman, he played in all 13 games with one start, and saw action on special teams — registering a blocked field goal — before he made his first collegiate start in the Music City Bowl.Mike McGlincheyNFLSan Francisco 49ers

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