Sacred Heart riding momentum into CCS semifinals

Examiner file photoBurst of speed: SHC running back Valentino Miles will try to put together some big runs today in the CCS semis.

Examiner file photoBurst of speed: SHC running back Valentino Miles will try to put together some big runs today in the CCS semis.

The Sacred Heart Cathedral football team (6-5) won in convincing fashion on the road in the first round of the CCS Division III playoffs against fourth-seeded Monterey last week, but will run into another unknown in the form of Christopher today in the semifinals at 7 p.m. at Gilroy High School.

The No. 1 Cougars (10-1) validated their top seed last week, however, with a 55-0 win over eighth-seeded Del Mar (7-4). The Cougars only gained 293 yards of total offense against Del Mar, but forced six turnovers and two went for defensive touchdowns.

The Irish have a standout, turnover-heavy defense of their own, but will turn to standout Valentino Miles for offense. Miles’ big runs in the second half against Monterey allowed the Irish to pull away last week.

ST. IGNATIUS AT VALLEY CHRISTIAN

While Sacred Heart Cathedral gets an unknown in the semifinals, St. Ignatius (4-6-1) will get a foe it is all too familiar on Saturday at 7 p.m.

The No. 7 Wildcats fell to the Warriors 24-21 in the regular season, but the game was in San Francisco and Valley Christian standout running back Byron Marshall was still not entirely healthy.

The Oregon-bound wingback ran for 73 yards against the Wildcats on Oct. 15, but showed just how much damage he can do against Sacred Heart two weeks later when he ran for 191 yards and three touchdowns on just 11 carries.

Still, the Wildcats should be entering the game with a ton of momentum after stunning second-seeded Aptos last week after trailing 24-7 with seconds remaining in the third quarter. No. 3 Valley Christian (6-5) cruised to a 35-21 win over sixth-seeded Burlingame last week, removing most of its starters after taking a 28-6 halftime lead.

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