Chris Carlson/apDavid Shaw is often mentioned in connection with NFL job openings

Rose Bowl coaches show power of persistence

Stanford’s David Shaw and Michigan State’s Mark Dantonio have built powerhouse teams over the last few years, and so far they’ve both stuck around when bigger football powers with deeper pockets came calling.

When the Spartans and Cardinal clash in the 100th edition of the Rose Bowl on Wednesday, Dantonio and Shaw will demonstrate the power of persistence in building a winner.

Shaw usually just chuckles when he’s connected with head coaching vacancies in the NFL or at the nation’s top college programs.

“To be honest, it’s unbelievably flattering,” he said Monday. “I think it’s really cool.”

In his own understated way, Dantonio takes the same approach to their unpredictable profession.

“When we came here seven years ago, we made a statement this is where we wanted to come,” Dantonio said. “We’re here now. We’ve accomplished that goal. Now we need to figure out, do we belong? That’s another opportunity, statement, challenge.”

Both coaches have turned themselves into valuable properties by building formidable programs — and then staying at two schools sometimes considered stepping stones instead of destinations.

Shaw is 34-6 in three seasons in charge at Stanford, banking two Pac-12 titles during the remarkable renaissance created alongside departed coach Jim Harbaugh. Dantonio is 63-29 at Michigan State since 2007, winning at least 11 games in three of his last four seasons.

Such success quickly leads to higher-profile opportunities, and other winning coaches at both schools have used these jobs as springboards to big money and power. Tyrone Willingham turned a moderately successful tenure at Stanford into the Notre Dame job in late 2001, while Nick Saban infamously left Michigan State for LSU shortly before the Spartans’ bowl game in late 1999.

But when Shaw and Dantonio are asked about their own desirability, both coaches play it off with a combination of amusement and outspoken loyalty to the schools that put them in this position.

Shaw has been a part of four straight trips to BCS bowls — an unthinkable standard just a few years earlier at the academic dynamo better known for Nobel Prizes than football trophies.

Shaw isn’t offended by the attention he receives from other schools, but he also has never sounded terribly interested in leaving his alma mater.

He appeared at the top of many Southern California fans’ wish lists earlier this month, but openly laughed at the notion of moving south.

“I don’t mind it, [but] I have no desires to pursue another job,” said Shaw, who has nine years of NFL coaching experience. “I have not and don’t plan on interviewing with anybody. I think it’s really nice that my name gets batted around … but honestly, I’m looking forward to playing this game and getting into the offseason and starting to put together another winning season next year.”

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