Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry, left, watches his daughter Riley as she examines his wax figure by Madame Tussauds earier this year. Riley helped her dad put his NBA Finals loss in perspective. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry, left, watches his daughter Riley as she examines his wax figure by Madame Tussauds earier this year. Riley helped her dad put his NBA Finals loss in perspective. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Riley Curry helps Steph keep loss in perspective

The Golden State Warriors’ practice facility on Monday was not an upbeat place.

After meeting with general manager Bob Myers for their respective exit interviews, Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green faced the media. They spoke of avoiding their TVs and how badly they wished to not be in their current predicament.

“To sit and dwell on it, that’s not going to do anything for me,” Green said. “I’m not going to sit and throw a pity party for myself or my teammates or anybody else. We were a minute away from winning a championship. We had a 3-1 lead, we had all the opportunities in the world we needed. Got to take your hat off to [the Cavs]. They fought, they battled and they took the series. It’s nothing to sit around and cry about.”

(Green won’t have the time to sit around and do much of anything as he committed to playing for Team USA in the upcoming Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, according to a report from The Undefeated.)

But once again, Curry’s 3-year old daughter, Riley, stole the show.

“I had a moment. I told Riley, ‘We didn’t win,’” Curry said. “She looked at me and was like, ‘I know. It’s OK.’”

“At the end of the day, there’s still life and you can still win at life,” Curry went on to say about what he learned from spending time with his family after the devastating loss.

Meanwhile, a 29-year-old man named Riley Curry is finding out how miserable the internet is for women of all ages by having the Twitter handle @rileycurry.

“It’s been stuff like, ‘You should tell your parents to kill themselves,’” adult Riley told USA Today. “All this stuff that is just awful. The problem isn’t about me being bothered or offended or getting my feelings hurt. It’s the fact that on social media, people say whatever they want without there being any accountability or consequences. People say these awful things potentially to a three-year-old little girl. It’s alarming and kind of sad.”

Twitter, write a code that automatically deletes any account that threatens a toddler.Golden State WarriorsRiley CurrySteph Curry

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