Giancarlo Stanton doesn't exactly want to come to San Francisco. The Giants just have to hope their biggest rivals don't want him. (Courtesy Corn Farmer/Flickr)

Giancarlo Stanton doesn't exactly want to come to San Francisco. The Giants just have to hope their biggest rivals don't want him. (Courtesy Corn Farmer/Flickr)

Remember, it’s not your money the Giants would be spending on Giancarlo Stanton

The Giancarlo Stanton sweepstakes is ongoing with the San Francisco Giants currently the frontrunner to go home with a helluva prize.

On Thursday night, Stanton’s representatives met with Bobby Evans and company in Los Angeles with the hopes of completing a deal, according to a report by Craig Mish.

For the Giants’ sake, this is a move that absolutely has to happen. If contending in the near future is the priority, getting Stanton is Plan A, Plan B, and Plan C.

Media reports indicate that the Giants are committed to paying most of the $295 million left on Stanton’s contract. He’ll maintain the opt-out option in his deal for after the 2020 season, when he’ll be 30 years old.

The Marlins reportedly would accept an offer of second baseman Joe Panik along with minor league prospects Tyler Beede and Chris Shaw as long as the Giants were willing to foot the bill.

Sounds like a win, right? It’s highway robbery, if you ask me: A bonafide slugger — filling San Francisco’s most desperate need — coming off a season in which he slugged 59 homers in exchange for Panik and two players who haven’t proved they can play at the major league level?

Yeah, that’s a steal for the Giants — even for the frugal folks out there complaining about Stanton’s contract.

Before you all get your hopes up about this right-field terror, keep in mind that Stanton has a full no-trade clause. He can say no the Giants.

Stanton is from Southern California and went to high school in Sherman Oaks, and guess what? The Los Angeles Dodgers are reportedly his first choice. Not shocking that he’d want to try to hit another baseball completely out of Dodger Stadium like he did in 2016.

They’re also ready to win, having won five-straight NL West titles, including a World Series trip this past season that ended in heartbreak.

So how do the Giants sell Stanton on San Francisco? How can they pry the 6-foot-6, 245-pound beast from Miami?

They have to sell him on the fanbase and how he can immediately inject excitement into it. After all, since AT&T Park opened in 2000, they’ve broken the three-million mark in attendance all but two of those seasons.

With that said, I certainly am getting tired of folks making excuses for this franchise and how they shouldn’t take on this money. The Giants already have the second-highest payroll in baseball behind the Dodgers.

They print money at 3rd and King. They paid off the privately funded building before the 2016 season, meaning they can afford a higher payroll than most MLB clubs.

There’s no case for frugality for a team that finished 40 games behind the Dodgers. (Heck, this team finished seven games behind the freaking San Diego Padres.) In order to compete — with the Dodgers, Colorado Rockies, Arizona Diamondbacks, and Padres — they need power.

And power doesn’t come cheap.

Giants fans are over the days of watching them pump out a puny 128 home runs — which was dead last in major league baseball. And it showed as fans stopped showing up in the second half of the 2017 season.

Pull out the Brinks truck, show off the beautiful scenery in the Bay Area, and bring the slugger to San Francisco. It is a deal the Giants must make happen, despite the large price tag.

Bonta Hill of 95.7 The Game can be heard from 12-3 on the Greg Papa Show. Born and bred in San Francisco, he is a sports junkie who loves to sit in the lab (home), eats breakfast food for dinner, and has a newfound love for tequila. Follow at your own risk on Twitter @BontaHill.arizona diamondbacks. Joe panikchris shawColorado RockiesGiancarlo StantonLos Angeles DodgersMiami MarlinsSan Francisco GiantsTyler Beede

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