Josh Reddick fractured his thumb sliding into second base in the seventh inning. Reddick hit his fifth home run of the season earlier in the game. (Ben Margot/AP)

Josh Reddick fractured his thumb sliding into second base in the seventh inning. Reddick hit his fifth home run of the season earlier in the game. (Ben Margot/AP)

Reddick breaks thumb, becomes Oakland’s 12th player on the DL

OAKLAND — Josh Reddick had his head buried in his locker with his back to the rest of the clubhouse.

The right fielder, who fractured his thumb in the Oakland Athletics’ 4-1 loss to the New York Yankees on Tuesday night, was so angry that he almost seemed calm.

“Frustrating isn’t even the word,” Reddick explained as he stood up to address the herd of reporters that had descended upon his locker. “It’s pissed off.”

The A’s have been hit with so many injuries that manager Bob Melvin has lost track of how many of his players have landed on the shelf.

“Does that take us to 11 or 12 on the DL right now?” Melvin asked.

The answer is 12, which means the A’s have more players on the disabled list than any other team in baseball.

That list includes former All-Star Henderson Alvarez and starting second baseman Jed Lowrie, but there’s no avoiding the reality that the loss of Reddick is the most painful yet.

“He hits third for us everyday,” Melvin said, when asked to explain the magnitude of the injury. “He’s one of the better players in the league,”

After going 2-for-3 — including his fourth-inning solo shot that bounced off the top of the out-of-town scoreboard in right field — Reddick had run his average all the way to .322.

That was before he slid safely into second base on a steal attempt in the seventh inning and fractured his thumb colliding with one of Starlin Castro’s spikes.

According to Reddick, the initial timeline for his return to the lineup is four to six weeks.

“I was having a great year,” Reddick said. “[I had] cemented myself as a three-hole hitter with this team.”

The timing of the injury is particularly cruel for Reddick and his club. After winning four of five, the A’s record stands at a respectable 19-23.

Now, Oakland must make do without one of its top offensive contributors and its most dangerous threat from the left side of the plate for at least a month.

There’s no telling where the A’s will be in the standings by the time Reddick returns in late June to mid-July. And if the team does take a turn for the worse, there won’t be much time for the free-agent-to-be to prove he’s healthy and rebuild his trade value before the deadline rolls around.

“Something so simple can be so damaging,” Reddick said. “You couldn’t understand the frustration involved in this.”karl buscheckKendall GravemanMLBOakland A'sOakland Athletics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Health care workers in the intensive care unit at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, with Alejandro Balderas, a 44-year-old patient who later died. Even in California, a state with a coronavirus vaccination rate well above average, the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 has nearly doubled in the past two weeks, according to a New York Times database. (Isadora Kosofsky/The New York Times)
Why COVID took off in California, again

‘The good news is: The vaccines are working’

Lake Oroville stood at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
A kayaker on the water at Lake Oroville, which stands at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 in Oroville, Calif. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
Facing ‘dire water shortages,’ California bans Delta pumping

By Rachel Becker CalMatters In an aggressive move to address “immediate and… Continue reading

Students practice identifying species in the school garden at Verde Elementary in Richmond during summer camp. (Photo courtesy of Verde Elementary)
Reading, writing and bike riding: How schools spent summer helping students recover from pandemic

By Sydney Johnson EdSource Bicycles typically aren’t allowed on the blacktop at… Continue reading

Most Read