Raiders Nation in limbo as L.A. politicking escalates

As Raiders fans, players and coaches wait in relocation limbo to see if the team will join the San Diego Chargers in Los Angeles, the St. Louis Rams say a separate stadium proposal is vastly superior to the rival plan in Carson and could be a financial windfall for the NFL.

That’s what the Rams argued in their relocation application submitted to the league this week. The 29-page document, obtained Tuesday by the Los Angeles Times, lays out the team’s rationale for why it should be able to leave St. Louis and how it believes such a move would ultimately strengthen the league.

“The Rams’ Inglewood Project presents the League and all of the Member Clubs with the best opportunity for successful long-term operations in Los Angeles,” the application said.

If the league were to approve the plan of the Rams’ deep-pocketed owner, Stan Kroenke, over the joint project of Raiders owner Mark Davis and Chargers owner Dean Spanos, that might be good news for Bay Area-based Raiders fans who hope the team stays in Oakland. Then again, it might not: Oakland leaders still haven’t submitted a plan to the league, only sending a letter expressing their desire to keep the Raiders while not wanting to use public money on any stadium project.

That forced Davis to officially file for relocation this week, setting up a three-way showdown for one or two L.A. landing spots at a showdown meeting of league owners next week in Houston. “In accordance with the relocation policies, the Oakland Raiders submitted a relocation package to the NFL,” the team said on its website. “The matter is now in the hands of the NFL’s owners.”

Kroenke wants to build a $1.86 billion stadium in Inglewood that would serve as the centerpiece of a 298-acre entertainment, retail and housing development at the site of the former Hollywood Park racetrack.

The Raiders and Chargers, AFC West rivals, are teaming on a competing project in Carson. The $1.7 billion venue would be built on a 157-acre parcel located on an old landfill adjacent to the 405 Freeway. Those teams used their applications to tout a site projected to open in 2019, detailing reasons why they should be allowed to leave Oakland and San Diego.

“We’ll all find out at the same time,” Raiders quarterback Derek Carr said. “We don’t get any inside information. We don’t have any right now. The thing that matters, though, is that no matter what’s in front of it, we’re always the Raiders. No matter what city is put in front of that, we love Oakland. This is where I’ve played, so I love Oakland. I love our fans. But I know that Raider Nation is everywhere. It doesn’t matter what’s put in front, we’re always the Raiders.

“People always think about us, but they shouldn’t. They should think about our wives, our kids. Some people have kids in school, so they have to move and those kinds of things. It affects them way more than it affects us. We just show up and work. That’s how we’ve been trained. That’s our process. It definitely affects them more.”

Said Raiders coach Jack Del Rio, who grew up near Oakland in Hayward: “I’m back home. I love the fact that I’m back home, but it’s not my position. As a head football coach, it’s my job to get this team ready to play and make sure we’re competitive.”

In advance of next week’s meeting, the NFL’s stadium, finance and L.A. committees will convene today and Thursday at league headquarters in New York to discuss the situation.

Although developers at the Inglewood site have long maintained that their stadium would be ready for the 2018 season, the Rams’ application targets 2019 as the proposed start date. There was no elaboration on the change for a project that the Rams describe as “shovel ready.”

The document provides a rare look into a landmark moment in the NFL’s two-decade quest to return to L.A.; this is the first time teams have formally asked to relocate to the country’s second-largest market.

The application is divided into three parts: Discussing the strengths of the Inglewood plan, explaining why the Rams have a right to move after two decades in St. Louis and outlining how the league will benefit from the team’s relocation.

The application provided the most detailed look at the stadium, which would be the NFL’s largest, since the project’s unveiling a year ago. The venue would be capable of hosting two teams with 70,240 fixed seats and be capable of accommodating an additional 30,000 people in standing-room only capacity for large events. There would be 274 suites, 16,300 premium seats and 12,675 dedicated surface parking spaces — all numbers the Rams say exceed those in the Carson proposal.

“We believe an Inglewood Super Bowl could generate as much as $50 million more in League revenue than the Carson proposed stadium based on increases in seat capacity, premium seating and total number of suites,” the application said.

The Rams envision the stadium forming the hub of NFL activity on the West Coast. That includes the stadium — which would be nearly three million square feet — hosting the combine and Pro Bowl. The neighboring performance venue could be home to the NFL draft, NFL Honors and other league-themed events such as NFL Films premieres. Some of the office space in the planned mixed-use development around the stadium could accommodate the NFL Network, NFL Media and NFL Digital, allowing them “dynamic new space just three miles from their current Culver City location.”

The Rams argue that they have the strongest L.A. fan base of the three teams seeking to relocate.

“Polling throughout the relocation process has consistently shown the Rams as a single team have more fan support than the Chargers and Raiders combined,” the application said.

The document cites the results of a marketing focus group the NFL held in L.A. in August in which “30 out of 53 respondents preferred the Rams to relocate, followed by 17 votes for the Chargers and six for the Raiders.”

As Raiders fans, players and coaches wait in relocation limbo to see if the team will join the San Diego Chargers in Los Angeles, the St. Louis Rams say a separate stadium proposal is vastly superior to the rival plan in Carson and could be a financial windfall for the NFL.

That’s what the Rams argued in their relocation application submitted to the league this week. The 29-page document, obtained Tuesday by the Los Angeles Times, lays out the team’s rationale for why it should be able to leave St. Louis and how it believes such a move would ultimately strengthen the league.

“The Rams’ Inglewood Project presents the League and all of the Member Clubs with the best opportunity for successful long-term operations in Los Angeles,” the application said.

If the league were to approve the plan of the Rams’ deep-pocketed owner, Stan Kroenke, over the joint project of Raiders owner Mark Davis and Chargers owner Dean Spanos, that might be good news for Bay Area-based Raiders fans who hope the team stays in Oakland. Then again, it might not: Oakland leaders still haven’t submitted a plan to the league, only sending a letter expressing their desire to keep the Raiders while not wanting to use public money on any stadium project.

That forced Davis to officially file for relocation this week, setting up a three-way showdown for one or two L.A. landing spots at a showdown meeting of league owners next week in Houston. “In accordance with the relocation policies, the Oakland Raiders submitted a relocation package to the NFL,” the team said on its website. “The matter is now in the hands of the NFL’s owners.”

Kroenke wants to build a $1.86 billion stadium in Inglewood that would serve as the centerpiece of a 298-acre entertainment, retail and housing development at the site of the former Hollywood Park racetrack.

The Raiders and Chargers, AFC West rivals, are teaming on a competing project in Carson. The $1.7 billion venue would be built on a 157-acre parcel located on an old landfill adjacent to the 405 Freeway. Those teams used their applications to tout a site projected to open in 2019, detailing reasons why they should be allowed to leave Oakland and San Diego.

“We’ll all find out at the same time,” Raiders quarterback Derek Carr said. “We don’t get any inside information. We don’t have any right now. The thing that matters, though, is that no matter what’s in front of it, we’re always the Raiders. No matter what city is put in front of that, we love Oakland. This is where I’ve played, so I love Oakland. I love our fans. But I know that Raider Nation is everywhere. It doesn’t matter what’s put in front, we’re always the Raiders.

“People always think about us, but they shouldn’t. They should think about our wives, our kids. Some people have kids in school, so they have to move and those kinds of things. It affects them way more than it affects us. We just show up and work. That’s how we’ve been trained. That’s our process. It definitely affects them more.”

Said Raiders coach Jack Del Rio, who grew up near Oakland in Hayward: “I’m back home. I love the fact that I’m back home, but it’s not my position. As a head football coach, it’s my job to get this team ready to play and make sure we’re competitive.”

In advance of next week’s meeting, the NFL’s stadium, finance and L.A. committees will convene today and Thursday at league headquarters in New York to discuss the situation.

Although developers at the Inglewood site have long maintained that their stadium would be ready for the 2018 season, the Rams’ application targets 2019 as the proposed start date. There was no elaboration on the change for a project that the Rams describe as “shovel ready.”

The document provides a rare look into a landmark moment in the NFL’s two-decade quest to return to L.A.; this is the first time teams have formally asked to relocate to the country’s second-largest market.

The application is divided into three parts: Discussing the strengths of the Inglewood plan, explaining why the Rams have a right to move after two decades in St. Louis and outlining how the league will benefit from the team’s relocation.

The application provided the most detailed look at the stadium, which would be the NFL’s largest, since the project’s unveiling a year ago. The venue would be capable of hosting two teams with 70,240 fixed seats and be capable of accommodating an additional 30,000 people in standing-room only capacity for large events. There would be 274 suites, 16,300 premium seats and 12,675 dedicated surface parking spaces — all numbers the Rams say exceed those in the Carson proposal.

“We believe an Inglewood Super Bowl could generate as much as $50 million more in League revenue than the Carson proposed stadium based on increases in seat capacity, premium seating and total number of suites,” the application said.

The Rams envision the stadium forming the hub of NFL activity on the West Coast. That includes the stadium — which would be nearly three million square feet — hosting the combine and Pro Bowl. The neighboring performance venue could be home to the NFL draft, NFL Honors and other league-themed events such as NFL Films premieres. Some of the office space in the planned mixed-use development around the stadium could accommodate the NFL Network, NFL Media and NFL Digital, allowing them “dynamic new space just three miles from their current Culver City location.”

The Rams argue that they have the strongest L.A. fan base of the three teams seeking to relocate.

“Polling throughout the relocation process has consistently shown the Rams as a single team have more fan support than the Chargers and Raiders combined,” the application said.

The document cites the results of a marketing focus group the NFL held in L.A. in August in which “30 out of 53 respondents preferred the Rams to relocate, followed by 17 votes for the Chargers and six for the Raiders.”Los AngelesNFLOakland RaidersSan Diego ChargersSt. Louis RamsStadium deal

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