Oakland Raiders outside linebacker Ray-Ray Armstrong warms up before an NFL football game against the Chicago Bears, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015, in Chicago. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

Oakland Raiders outside linebacker Ray-Ray Armstrong warms up before an NFL football game against the Chicago Bears, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015, in Chicago. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

Raider may face felony for barking at K-9

PITTSBURGH — Raiders linebacker Ray-Ray Armstrong may face a third-degree felony charge for allegedly taunting a police dog in a Heinz Field tunnel before last Sunday’s game against the Steelers.

According to Pittsburgh police, Armstrong is accused of lifting his shirt, pounding on his chest and barking at the dog before telling a female K-9 deputy to release the dog as he made his way toward the field for the game. Taunting a K-9 is a felony in Pennsylvania.

“We were immediately notified about the incident, and we immediately initiated a criminal investigation into the matter,” Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Kevin Kraus told Pittsburgh television station KDKA. “Sheriff’s Office supervisors interviewed witnesses and reviewed video surveillance recordings at Heinz Field. We notified the District Attorney’s office on Sunday.”

Armstrong has not been charged in the incident and was not interviewed before the Raiders returned to Oakland after the game. A video from the stadium was reviewed by authorities Tuesday, Kraus said.

Said Kraus: “He came out of the locker room, he started jumping up and down, intimidating the dog, calling for the dog. The dog immediately responded and tried to make its way over to the player, the K-9 deputy prevented the dog from doing so.”

Armstrong is now a special-teams player for the Raiders after his demotion from a starting role. He was signed in October of last season after he was released by the St. Louis Rams.

NFL

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