Personal Best: B.A.D. Girls set to do damage this season

When she’s “Dolly Deathrow Pardon” on the flat-track roller derby rink, Carey Sebera of B.A.D. Girls is proud to be bad.
Away from roller derby, though, the Bay Area Derby Girls competitor is anything but bad.

“I’m a real softy at heart,” said the Ducati Monster-riding Texas native who bears a stronger resemblance to the Reese Witherspoon character from Legally Blonde than to Dolly Parton. “I do public interest law and want to do therapy. Derby is just a healthy way for women to get aggression out and feel empowered on the track.”

The collegiate soccer player, ex-Peace Corps volunteer and certified yoga instructor was seeking a new challenge when she discovered roller derby.

After moving back from New York to her Potrero Hill district home in San Francisco this past summer, Sebera, 37, was barely unpacked when she contacted B.A.D. Girls to satisfy the passion for roller derby she acquired playing for a team in Yonkers.
“I’m a stronger derby player than a skater; my hitting skills are better than my skating skills,” Sebera said. “What makes an incredible player is combining those two.”

Sebera is a month removed from an 80 mile per hour collision with a deer in the Nevada desert. Her car, not the Ducati, rolled 12 times; she survived with nothing more serious than a separated rotator cuff.

The injury hasn’t stopped Sebera from working out with the three B.A.D. Girls teams for two to three hours a day, five nights a week. She’ll be drafted at the end of this month for the upcoming season by either the Oakland Outlaws, Richmond Wrecking Belles, San Francisco ShEvil Dead or a to-be-formed expansion team.

“I scrimmaged last night for three hours with ShEvil, which was brutal, and I’m still sore, but it was good,” she said while adjusting her neck and rubbing her shoulder.

Flat track varies greatly from banked track “performance” derby. There is no choreography in flat track, no planned outcomes or dramatic violence. It’s pure sport with a comprehensive set of rules.

The bouts consist of two-minute “jams.” Each team has five players on the track. The jammer sprints to fight her way thorough the opponent’s pack, a group of four blockers led by the pivot. Points are scored as the jammers lap and pass opposing blockers.

“People start out wanting to be a jammer,” Sebera said. “But after finding out how much you get knocked around, it’s hard to find jammers these days.”

 

Bay Area Derby Girls

 

ROSTER: 24 players, with 14 in uniform for each bout

UPCOMING EVENTS: Scrimmage, demo and breast cancer fundraiser, Friday, 444 Jesse St., San Francisco; S.F. ShEvil Dead vs. Richmond Wrecking Belles, Oct. 30, Craneway Pavilion, Richmond

INFO: www.bayareaderbygirls.com

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