Courtesy photoOpen-water swimmer Jamie Patrick is preparing to try and swim 75 uninterrupted miles across Lake Michigan later this summer.

Courtesy photoOpen-water swimmer Jamie Patrick is preparing to try and swim 75 uninterrupted miles across Lake Michigan later this summer.

Pair of unlikely participants set for women's final

LONDON — Whether in a match, a set, a game — or even within a single point — Sabine Lisicki simply cannot be counted out.

Especially at Wimbledon, where she is one victory from becoming a Grand Slam champion.

Fashioning the same sort of comeback she used to eliminate defending titlist Serena Williams at the All England Club, the 23rd-seeded Lisicki reached her first major final by edging No. 4 Agnieska Radwanska of Poland 6-4, 2-6, 9-7 in a compelling, back-and-forth match Thursday.

“I just fought with all my heart,” said Lisicki, who twice was two points away from losing to 2012 runner-up Radwanska. “I believed that I could still win, no matter what the score was.”

On Saturday, Lisicki will face 15th-seeded Marion Bartoli, who took a nap on a locker-room couch before heading out to Centre Court and earning a berth in her second Wimbledon final with a 6-1, 6-2 victory over No. 20 Kirsten Flipkens of Belgium.

It's only the second time in the 45-year Open era that two women who have never won a Grand Slam trophy will play for the championship at the grass-court tournament.

Germany's Lisicki and France's Bartoli also form the second-lowest pair of seeded women to meet for the Wimbledon title. In 2007, Bartoli was No. 18 when she lost to No. 23 Venus Williams.

“In the beginning of the tournament, no one, I think, [expected] those names in the semis or in the finals,” Radwanska said.

That's for sure.

In 11 of the past 13 years, one Williams sister or the other — and sometimes both — reached the final at the All England Club.

Agnieska RadwanskaOther SportsSabine LisickiWimbledon

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