Pablo Sandoval named World Series MVP

Matt Solcum/Getty ImagesPablo Sandoval (48) of the San Francisco Giants poses with the Most Valuable Player Trophy after Game 4 of the World Series.

Matt Solcum/Getty ImagesPablo Sandoval (48) of the San Francisco Giants poses with the Most Valuable Player Trophy after Game 4 of the World Series.

Pablo Sandoval not only has baseball's neatest nickname, Kung Fu Panda has a World Series MVP award to go along with it.

Sandoval took home the trophy following the San Francisco Giants' sweep of Detroit, hitting .500 with three home runs, a double and four RBIs in 16 Series at-bats.

“It's just an incredible moment you're never going to forget,” he said.

This Panda works with lumber, not bamboo.

Sandoval got the Giants off to a powerful start by hitting three homers in the opener against the Tigers, becoming the fourth player to accomplish that feat in a World Series game.

He made his big league debut with the Giants on Aug. 14, 2008, and earned his nickname just a month later. That Sept. 19 at Dodger Stadium, Sandoval scored from second on Bengie Molina's first-inning single off Greg Maddux, leaping sideways to avoid catcher Danny Ardoin's lunging tag on the throw from center fielder Matt Kemp.

Maddux and Dodgers manager Joe Torre argued Sandoval ran out of the baseline. Barry Zito, on the mound for the Giants that night, coined the nickname for Sandoval's oversized personality and roly-poly shape — the animated film “Kung Fu Panda” had been released in theaters that June.

While Sandoval hit .330 in 2009 and finished second to Hanley Ramirez in the NL batting race, the Giants launched “Operation Panda” that offseason, telling him to ditch the Big Macs, fries and milkshakes in favor of chicken breast on wheat bread, watermelon slices, bananas and oranges. He started lifting.

Sandoval's weight is listed at 240 on the Giants' website, 235 on the players' site. At one point, he had been up to at least 272.

“I just want to keep that a secret,” he said three years ago, trying to avoid an exact number.

By the time the 2010 World Series rolled around, when the Giants won their first title in 56 years, Sandoval was benched for four of five games following a slump. His weight had gone up again, and his batting average had gone down to .268. He made 13 errors and grounded into a league-high 26 double plays.

He responded by hiring a personal chef. He ran up desert hills in Arizona during the offseason, causing him to throw up regularly. Sandoval's average rebounded to .315, and he made his first All-Star team. Then at this summer's showcase in Kansas City, he hit the first bases-loaded triple in All-Star history, a drive off Justin Verlander in a five-run first inning that helped secure home-field advantage for the NL in the World Series.

“You learn,” Sandoval said. “You learn from everything that happened in your career. … We're working hard to enjoy this moment right now.”

Sandoval credited Giants manager Bruce Bochy and general manager Brian Sabean for pushing him.

“When you have a good manager, good GM, throwing all the things in your face, you have to keep focused and keep playing and keep working hard,” he said.

After Sandoval went deep three times in the opener, matching the Series record shared by Babe Ruth, Reggie Jackson and Albert Pujols, the Giants sold 760 more of their furry panda hats, including 466 at AT&T Park during Game 2. Venezuela President Hugo Chavez tweeted “Pablo going down in history! Long live Venezuela!!”

GiantsMLBPablo SandovalSan FranciscoSan Francisco Giants

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