Oregon State football player, Bay Area native Fred Thompson dies

AP Photo/Oregon State UniversityThis undated image provided by the Oregon State University shows freshman football player Fred Thompson who was playing basketball on campus Wednesday Dec. 7

Oregon State defensive tackle Fred Thompson died Wednesday night after he collapsed while playing basketball at a campus recreation center.

Thompson, just four days shy of his 20th birthday, was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis, where he was pronounced dead.

Thompson, 6-foot-4 and 317 pounds, was a true freshman from Richmond, Calif., who played at Oakland Tech High School.

He was part of the 2010 recruiting class but delayed his enrollment until this January. He spent this season recovering from shoulder surgery and was considered a grayshirt.

Coach Mike Riley was on a recruiting trip but was expected back at Oregon State on Thursday.

Some players gathered at Valley Football Center after word spread of Thompson's death, and the front page of the Beavers' website paid tribute to the young player.

Oregon State cornerback Jordan Poyer posted on Twitter: “R.I.P Fred Im really gonna miss you bro. My prayers go to you and your family.”

His team biography said Thompson chose Oregon State because of the “family vibe, nice campus and great academics.” It says he was contemplating majoring in business.

Just Posted

SF’s newest subway may emerge on the West Side

San Francisco’s sleepy West Side — from the Richmond District to Parkmerced… Continue reading

Treasure Island residents could win new displacement protections

Supervisor working to give all current residents a chance to move into new development

Bay Bridge fire blocks Friday night traffic

UPDATE 11:35 p.m.: The fire is out, Caltrans is reporting. Three of… Continue reading

SF lawmaker proposes car-free Tenderloin streets

Proposal comes after a spate of traffic deaths in the neighborhood.

SF to open seventh job center in ‘overlooked’ neighborhoods

Oceanview, Merced Heights, Ingleside area has unemployment rates much higher than the city average

Most Read