No more free cars for Woods, says GM

General Motors Co. says an agreement with Tiger Woods that allowed the fallen golf star to have free access to its vehicles is over.

Woods' endorsement contract with GM's Buick brand ended in 2008, but an arrangement remained in place that allowed him to keep several GM loaner vehicles. A spokesman says the arrangement ended on Dec. 31.

Woods has lost a host of endorsement contracts since the Nov. 27 car crash outside his Florida home. The accident triggered allegations marital infidelity that led him to take a break from professional golf, though the GM spokesman says the vehicle arrangement had been previously scheduled to end on Dec. 31.

USA Today reported GM's decision in a blog post Tuesday.

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