Baltimore Ravens strong safety Eric Weddle (32) watches Oakland Raiders wide receiver Seth Roberts (10) make a touchdown reception Oct. 2, 2016, in Baltimore. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun/TNS)

Baltimore Ravens strong safety Eric Weddle (32) watches Oakland Raiders wide receiver Seth Roberts (10) make a touchdown reception Oct. 2, 2016, in Baltimore. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun/TNS)

Nevada legislature holds special meeting to lure Raiders to Vegas

The Nevada state legislature is holding a special meeting Monday to consider spending $750 million in hotel tax money to help finance a new football stadium for the Oakland Raiders in Las Vegas.

A proclamation by Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval to convene the special session says his state’s economy “requires a careful balance of growing and attracting businesses that bring innovative new technologies and diversify our tax base while at the same time supporting and expanding our foundation as the world leader in gaming, tourism and entertainment.”

The proclamation says “The continued safety of residents and visitors is a top priority for this state and integral to our economic growth” and “an extraordinary occasion exists that requires immediate action by the Nevada state Legislature.”

In April the Raiders signed a lease extension agreement that keeps the football team at the Oakland Coliseum at least through the end of this year and possibly for two additional years.

But Raiders owner Mark Davis has had a wandering eye in recent years, first exploring the possibility of moving the team to San Antonio and then making a serious bid to build a new stadium in the Los Angeles area and move the team there. That proposal was rejected by National Football League owners at a meeting in January.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf couldn’t immediately be reached for comment Monday but she said last month that she remains hopeful that a deal can be reached to build a new football stadium in Oakland that would keep the Raiders in her city for the long term.footballLas VegasNFLOaklandRaiders

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