NCAA getting out of jersey-selling business

Tony Avelar/APMichael Phelps swims in the 200-meter individual medley final during the Santa Clara International Grand Prix swim meet Sunday.

Tony Avelar/APMichael Phelps swims in the 200-meter individual medley final during the Santa Clara International Grand Prix swim meet Sunday.

The NCAA is getting out of the memorabilia business.

NCAA President Mark Emmert said Thursday it would stop the practice immediately after reports this week that team jerseys and other items linked to individual schools could be found on its own website by searching for specific player names.

“I think seeing the NCAA sell those kinds of goods is a mistake,” Emmert said during a conference call with reporters. “It's not what the NCAA is about. So we're not going to be doing that any longer.”

The NCAA is being sued by former players and a handful of current college players in federal court over the use of athlete images and likenesses. And just this past week, ESPN reported that the NCAA is investigating Heisman Trophy-winner Johnny Manziel for allegedly being paid to sign memorabilia, which if true could jeopardize eligibility as a violation of NCAA amateurism rules.

Emmert said the commercial site won't be completely removed because there is still a market for generic NCAA apparel. He said the NCAA had hired another company to run the site, ShopNCAASports.com.

Mark Lewis, the NCAA's executive vice president for championships and alliances, also released a statement, saying university merchandise would not be offered, either.

“In the coming days, the store's website will be shut down temporarily and reopen in a few weeks as a marketplace for NCAA championship merchandise only,” Lewis said.

“After becoming aware of issues with the site, we determined the core function of the NCAA.com fan shop should not be to offer merchandise licensed by our member schools.”

Johnny ManzielMark EmmertNCAAOther Sports

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