Adam Silver addresses the media during the NBA Finals in Oakland. The NBA and its players' union is reportedly nearing a deal to avoid a potential lockout. (Jacob C. Palmer/S.F. Examiner)

Adam Silver addresses the media during the NBA Finals in Oakland. The NBA and its players' union is reportedly nearing a deal to avoid a potential lockout. (Jacob C. Palmer/S.F. Examiner)

NBA lockout apparently averted

Despite months of signaling from NBA owners that they weren’t making enough money, it appears the league will avoid a potential labor lockout.

The National Basketball Association and its Players Association are nearing a new multiyear Collective Bargaining Agreement, according to a report by The Vertical.

Adrian Wojnarowski, who is seldom wrong about matters regarding the NBA, described an agreement as “inevitable within the next few weeks.”

According to his report:

Among the principles in agreement, the NBA’s Basketball Related Income (BRI) split will remain unchanged in a new agreement, league sources said. The players receive a share in the range of 49 to 51 percent of the current BRI.

The NBA will raise rookie-scale, veteran minimum and free-agent exception deals in the new agreement, league sources said. Rises in those salaries could come in the 50 percent range over current numbers, sources said.

(READ MORE: Yahoo Sports)

Staying in place will be the league’s one-and-done rule that requires potential NBA players to spend a year after graduating high school before becoming eligible for the league.

The rule has several obvious holes in it. Most notably: If the player can earn money playing for a pro team, why should he have to wait? Although, the owners were considering pushing for another mandatory year in the negotiation process.

The No. 1 overall pick in the 2016 draft, Ben Simmons, pointed out an obvious hole to the rule recently on Twitter, by responding to a troll who called him out for his lackluster grades while he went through the farce of playing at Louisiana State for a season.

Simmons didn’t go to class because people go to college to enhance their job prospects. Simmons’ next move in his career was set before he stepped campus in Baton Rouge. So you can force somebody to go to a university, but you can’t make him go to class.

A dumb rule, but I think all NBA fans will agree that avoiding another lockout is worth it for the league.ben simmonscollective bargaining agreementnbpa

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