From left, New York Mets starters Steven Matz, Jacob deGrom and Matt Harvey along with catcher Travis d’Arnaud leave the field after batting practice in advance of Game 1 of the World Series on Tuesday at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. (Julie Jacobson/AP)

From left, New York Mets starters Steven Matz, Jacob deGrom and Matt Harvey along with catcher Travis d’Arnaud leave the field after batting practice in advance of Game 1 of the World Series on Tuesday at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. (Julie Jacobson/AP)

Mets’ young arms look unbeatable

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Anyone arriving a little early to a New York Mets game this season has probably witnessed “The Walk.”

Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom or another emerging ace striding in from the bullpen following pregame warmups, and the rest of that fearless rotation trailing just behind.
For opposing hitters, it’s become an imposing march to impending doom.

Riding four young starters all the way through October, the hard-throwing Mets are ready to fire their best stuff at the Kansas City Royals in the 111th World Series. Game 1 is tonight at Kauffman Stadium, with Harvey set to face Edinson Volquez.

“I don’t think any of us have really sat back and kind of realized what we can accomplish as a group,” Harvey said Monday. “Right now, it’s about our team and about winning.”

Kansas City came excruciatingly close to winning it all last year, losing Game 7 at home to Madison Bumgarner and the Giants with the potential tying run 90 feet from home plate.

“That’s pretty hard to swallow. That’s going to stay with you for a while,” Royals third baseman Mike Moustakas said. “I think the only way to get rid of that feeling is to go out this year and finish the deal.”

With cohesion and camaraderie in mind, deGrom said New York’s starters began watching each other warm up during spring training, when they all needed to be out on the field for the national anthem anyway. By the time rookies Noah Syndergaard and Steven Matz were called up from the minors, it was a signature part of the Mets’ routine.

“It’s just a great feeling to go out there and know that the other starting pitchers are out there supporting you as well,” Syndergaard said. “It’s kind of like we have almost our own little unit to support each other and push each other to be better.”Kansas City RoyalsMLBNew York MetsWorld Series

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