San Jose Sharks forward Raffi Torres on Monday received the longest suspension in NFL history for a hit on another player — punishment for an illegal check to the head of the Anaheim Ducks’ Jakob Silfverberg. (Tom Mihalek/AP)

San Jose Sharks forward Raffi Torres on Monday received the longest suspension in NFL history for a hit on another player — punishment for an illegal check to the head of the Anaheim Ducks’ Jakob Silfverberg. (Tom Mihalek/AP)

Longest NHL ban for Sharks’ Torres

Sharks forward Raffi Torres was hit with the longest suspension in NHL history for a hit on another player when the league banned him Monday for the first 41 games of the season for an illegal check to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

This marks the fifth and most significant suspension for Torres in his career. His previous longest ban had been a 21-game suspension — initially 25 games — for a high hit on Chicago’s Marian Hossa in the first round of the playoffs in 2012 when he played with Phoenix.

Torres was suspended for the final six games of the playoffs in 2013 with San Jose for a hit to the head against Los Angeles’ Jarret Stoll. Torres was also suspended for two games in January 2012 for charging Minnesota defenseman Nate Prosser, and he sat out four games in April 2011 for a hit to the head of Edmonton’s Jordan Eberle while playing for Vancouver.

The previous longest suspension for player-on-player violence was a 30-game suspension to Chris Simon of the New York Islanders in December 2007 for stomping on the skate of Pittsburgh forward Jarkko Ruutu.

Torres’ latest infraction resulted from a hit in a preseason game on Saturday in Anaheim. Torres was assessed a match penalty for the hit to Silverberg’s head. Torres waived the right to an in-person hearing and was suspended Monday.

The NHL Department of Player Safety ruled that the hit was illegal because Silfverberg’s head was the main point of contact, as well as late and would have been considered interference.

The Sharks had been counting on getting a boost from Torres this season after he played just 12 regular season and playoff games the past two seasons because of knee injuries.
But now they must go through the first half of the season without him. Torres will be eligible to return Jan. 14 against Edmonton.

Torres will forfeit $440,860 in salary for the suspension. The money goes to the Players’ Emergency Assistance Fund.

Just Posted

It’s not uncommon to find a plastic tampon applicator washed up on the beach. (Courtesy Eva Holman)
The environmental toll of disposable feminine products

Uninhibited feedback by cisgender women is key

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. PHOTO COURTESY SALESFORCE
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo)
(Shutterstock photo)
How San Francisco neighborhoods voted in the Newsom recall

Sunset tops the list as the area with the most ‘yes’ votes

Alison Collins, a member of the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education, listens during a board meeting. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Alison Collins speaks: Embattled SF school board member confronts the recall effort

‘It’s important for folks to know what this recall is about. It’s bigger than any one of us.’

Is the Black Cat incident a distraction from the recovery of The City’s storied nightlife industry or does Mayor London Breed’s behavior inadvertently highlight the predicament the industry’s been in since San Francisco reinstated indoor mask requirements on Aug. 20?<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner, 2021)</ins>
Club owners to maskless mayor: Are we the new fun police?

Black Cat affair highlights difficult recovery for nightlife industry

Most Read