Less than half the tickets sold so far for Rio Olympics

International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach, of Germany, left, speaks with Member of the International Olympic Committee, IOC, Anita DeFrantz, of the US, right, at the opening of the second and last day of the executive board meeting of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), in Lausanne, Switzerland, Wednesday, March 2, 2016. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP)

International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach, of Germany, left, speaks with Member of the International Olympic Committee, IOC, Anita DeFrantz, of the US, right, at the opening of the second and last day of the executive board meeting of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), in Lausanne, Switzerland, Wednesday, March 2, 2016. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP)

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — With five months to go before the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazilian organizers are struggling to sell tickets for South America’s first games. Don’t worry, says the IOC president, the locals will buy up tickets at the last minute.

On a day when Rio organizers provided reassurances over the Zika outbreak, venue delays, doping legislation, metro construction and other issues, Rio organizing committee spokesman Mario Andrada said only about 47 percent of the 7.5 million tickets on offer have been sold so far.

The revenue from ticket sales stands at $194 million, or 74 percent of the total target, he said.

Tickets for “premier events” and the Aug. 5 opening ceremony at the Maracana Stadium are essentially sold out, Andrada said.

Most tickets for the foreign market have been sold, he added, leaving domestic sales as the main priority.

“We are going to increase the ability for people to buy tickets,” Andrada said. “We plan to set up electronic ticket sales kiosks across the city.”

For the 2012 London Olympics, British organizers sold 8.2 million out of 8.5 million tickets. They raised 659 million pounds (nearly $1 billion) in ticket sales from the Olympics and Paralympics.

Ticket prices for the Rio Olympics range from 40 reals ($10) to a high of 4,600 reals ($1,170) for the opening ceremony. The average ticket price is 70 reals ($18) or less.

Amid a severe economic downturn, Brazil’s minimum monthly wage is 880 reals ($220) and the unemployment rate is running at about 10 percent.

International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach shrugged off the slow pace of ticket sales, saying it was part of the Brazilian way of doing things.

“I have no concerns at all there,” he said at a news conference following a two-day IOC executive board meeting. “Brazilians, they do not buy tickets at such an early stage, as the British or the Germans. There is no concern at all. We had comparable figures before Athens and other Olympic Games.”

“I have no doubt that when the time comes, these numbers will increase,” he said.

Rio organizers gave one of their final detailed progress reports to the IOC board, as Brazil faces severe economic and political crises. The board approved Rio’s balanced operating budget of about $1.8 billion.

Brazil is mired in its worst recession since the 1930s, President Dilma Rousseff is fighting impeachment and the country is dealing with a vast corruption scandal centered on state-controlled oil-and-gas giant Petrobras.

“Given this crisis, the achievements made by the organizing committee and the Brazilians are even more remarkable,” Bach said after giving a glowing assessment of Rio’s final preparations.

Brazil is also the epicenter of the spread of Zika, the mosquito-borne virus that has been linked to a rise in cases of babies born with abnormally small heads.

Rio organizers told the IOC they are following the guidance of the World Health Organization, which has declared the Zika outbreak a global health emergency but has said the Olympics should be safe during Brazil’s winter.

Andrada said there had been no discussion about the advice issued last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which said pregnant women should consider not going to Brazil and that their male sexual partners use condoms after the trip or abstain from sex during the pregnancy.

Bach said the IOC considers the WHO its “partner” on the Zika issue.

Andrada said athletes will have air conditioning in their rooms in the village and will be advised to keep the windows closed to keep any mosquitoes out.

“Zika is a moving target,” he said. “It’s a global tragedy, especially for women and pregnant woman. But from a broader games perspective, the WHO believes it will not be a major factor.”

Rio has been seeking to save $500 million to balance its budget, but Nuzman insisted the quality of the games would not be hurt by the economic pinch.

“The games will not be affected by any cuts,” he said. “There are no cuts that impact the games, the athletes or the field of play. We are not cost cutting. We are organizing a balanced budget. The most important thing is that we will have absolutely fantastic games in spectacular venues.”

Nuzman said 90-95 percent of the venues are finished. Delays on the velodrome will be overcome, he said, and the track cycling venue will be ready for a test event in late April.

On other issues, Nuzman said:

— a key subway line extension connecting the Copacabana and Ipanema beach areas to the western suburb of Barra da Tijuca, where the main Olympic Park is located, will be completed in time for the games. He said the state governor had given assurances that the 10.3 billion Brazilian real ($2 billion) project will be ready.

— a presidential decree will be enacted on March 15 to meet the March 18 deadline set by the World Anti-Doping Agency for Brazil to meet its global rules. If Brazil fails to comply, doping samples during the games could have to be sent outside Brazil for analysis.

— Rio will do monthly testing until April of the polluted waterways that will host Olympic sailing and rowing competitions. The testing will increase to twice a week after April and then will be conducted on a daily basis during the games.

OlympicsRio

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The Medical Examiner's Office van on Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco’s 2020 overdose deaths soar 59 percent to 699

Fatal drug overdoses surged by nearly 59 percent in San Francisco last… Continue reading

Police Commissioner John Hamasaki questions Chief Bill Scott at City Hall on Wednesday, May 15, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFPD should probe whether officers joined Capitol raid, commissioners say

Chief unaware of any members participating in insurrection

Homeless people's tents can be seen on Golden Gate Avenue in the Tenderloin on Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 16, 2020. (Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong/S.F. Examiner)
Statewide business tax could bring new funds to combat homelessness

San Francisco could get more than $100 million a year for housing, rental assistance, shelter beds

The Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco (a mural by artist Jamie Treacy is pictued) has a lineup of free online programming including activities for youngsters scheduled for Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan. 18. (Courtesy Demetri Broxton/Museum of the African Diaspora)
Stanford, Museum of the African Diaspora host MLK Day activities

Online offerings include films, music, discussion

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi presides the US House of Representatives vote on the impeachment of US President Donald Trump at the US Capitol, January 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. - The Democrat-controlled US House of Representatives on January 13 opened debate on a historic second impeachment of President Donald Trump over his supporters' attack of the Capitol that left five dead. (SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)
House votes 232-197 to impeach Trump a second time

Focus shifts to Senate, where McConnell has signaled he may not stand by president

Most Read