Lacrosse in Powell’s blood

Playing with his older brother, Ryan Powell didn’t have to carry the load offensively and often deferred to Casey when the two played together for the Rochester Rattlers.

But when Major League Lacrosse expanded to the West Coast this summer, Ryan Powell saw it as his opportunity to flourish on his own with the San Francisco Dragons.

Not that his accomplishments were shabby.

The 2001 MLL Most Valuable Player is tied with Boston’s Connor Gil for the league lead in points with 57, despite missing two games due to his commitment to Team USA. Powell, in his sixth season, is third in career points with 291.

“I’ve really had the opportunity to control the ball here, to quarterback the offense,” Powell said. “I just try to go out and play my game, get some shots on goal, and get other guys involved in the offense.”

The Dragons, who have lost three of their last four games, will need Powell and everyone else to be involved in the offense in order to make the playoffs. Entering Saturday’s 1 p.m. regular-season finale, the Dragons

(6-5) need to beat the Chicago Machine (0-11), a fellow expansion team, and hope the Western Conference-leading Denver Outlaws (9-2) beat the Los Angeles Riptide (6-5). Denver has already clinched one of the four playoff berths.

Along with his brothers — Casey and the younger Mike — Powell was part of the sport’s most famous and revered family. After a celebrated high school career in West Carthage, N.Y., Powell led powerhouse Syracuse to two national championships from 1997-2000, tying Casey atop the school’s all-time scoring mark (Mike has since replaced them as the leading scorer).

“It’s great to be out here on a new squad,” said Powell, who got the chance to play with both brothers for the first time competitively at the World Championships. “Coach [Brian] Silcott is a great coach and a good friend and he knows my style real well. He puts the ball in my stick and lets me play my game and it’s really opened things up for me.”

Despite an almost larger-than-life status in the lacrosse world, Powell remains humble.

“I’m from a small town and lacrosse is all I’ve ever really known,” he said. “I still coach about 15,000 kids each year in clinics and really try to stay involved with the sport as much as I can. I don’t think I’m some hot shot who is above the game. I’ll always give as much back as I can to lacrosse.”

NOTE: The Dragons will be holding a food drive at Saturday’s game, in cooperation with the San Francisco Food Bank and the Hamilton Family Center. Anyone donating non-perishable food or toiletries can buy a general admission ticket for $10.

Other Sportssports

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Baseball Hall of Famer Willie Mays attends an event to honor the San Francisco Giants' 2014 World Series victory on Thursday, June 4, 2015, in Washington, D.C. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS)
Willie Mays turns 90: San Francisco celebrates the greatest Giant

By Al Saracevic Examiner staff writer I couldn’t believe it. Willie Mays… Continue reading

Ja’Mari Oliver, center, 11, a fifth grader at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy, is surrounded by his classmates at a protest outside the Safeway at Church and Market streets on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 in support of him following an April 26 incident where he was falsely accused by an employee of stealing. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
School community rallies behind Black classmate stopped at Safeway

‘When you mess with one of us, you mess with all of us’

A warning notice sits under the windshield wiper of a recreational vehicle belonging to a homeless man named David as it sits parked on De Wolf Street near Alemany Boulevard on Friday, Aug. 31, 2018. A proposed SF Municipal Transportation Agency law would make it illegal for overnight parking on the side street for vehicles taller than seven feet or longer than 22 feet. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA to resume ‘poverty tows’ amid calls to make temporary ban permanent

Fines and fees hurt low-income, homeless residents, but officials say they are a necessary tool

Income from Shared Spaces will provide financial resources to the San Francisco Municipal Transporation Agency, according to its director, Jeffrey Tumlin. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA director says Shared Spaces serves transit agency’s financial interest

$10.6 million price tag for program raises concerns among transit agency’s board members

A broad coalition of tenants and housing rights organizers rally at Stanley Mosk Courthouse to protest eviction orders issued against renters Stanley Mosk Courthouse on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, in Los Angeles, CA. (Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Federal judge strikes down CDC’s national moratorium on evictions

David Yaffe-Bellany, Noah Buhayar Los Angeles Times A federal judge in Washington… Continue reading

Most Read