Trayce Thompson, brother of Klay, homered on Thursday against the Oakland Athletics. (Chris Carlson/AP)

Trayce Thompson, brother of Klay, homered on Thursday against the Oakland Athletics. (Chris Carlson/AP)

Klay Thompson’s brother homers vs. Athletics

MESA, Ariz. — Kenta Maeda pitched three scoreless innings in his second start, A.J. Ellis had two hits and drove in three runs and the Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Oakland Athletics 8-3 on Thursday.

Maeda signed a $25 million, eight-year deal with the Dodgers following eight professional seasons in Japan, a deal that could escalate to $106.2 million. He has yet to allow a run in five innings and has struck out five.

“His ability to change speeds keeps hitters off balance,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “He got up to 50 pitches. It was a good outing.”

A’s starter Rich Hill, who lasted 2 1-3 innings, got the opening two outs of the first before walking the bases loaded and giving up Ellis’ three-run double and Trayce Thompson’s two-run homer.

“He’s a veteran guy in the rotation,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said. “He had some ups and downs. It’s a great opportunity for him.”

Carl Crawford and Andre Ethier also drove in runs for the Dodgers. Billy Butler had two hits for the A’s.

Maeda isn’t taking anything for granted as he prepares for his first major league season after spending the previous eight years in Japan.

“I’m aware it’s spring training and not the regular season,” Maeda said through an interpreter. “I’m not concerned about results. I’m sure there will be a few bumps along the way.”

Maeda got strikeouts with his fastball, changeup and slider, though he’s not yet comfortable with his slider.

“The break was not too good on it,” he said.

As for differences between the two professional leagues, Maeda said he has noticed the bat speed among major leaguers “is pretty quick.”

Hill knows the results aren’t very good and that it will take a few minor tweaks to get where he wants to be.

“Physically I feel great,” Hill said. “To get some consistency is the biggest thing. I have to work on getting the ball more in the zone. It’s mechanical, it’s getting into a good flow where I can repeat my delivery, which equals a higher percentage of strikes.”

Hill would like to see some success soon.

“I have to have something to build from,” Hill said. “I have to create some momentum and that means seeing results here shortly.”

a.j. ellisandre ethierBob Melvincarl crawforddave robertskenta maedaLos Angeles DodgersMLBOakland A'sOakland AthleticsRich HillTrayce Thompson

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