Warriors All-Star Stephen Curry returned to the starting lineup on Friday, but scored just 19 points in the Warriors' loss. (Stan Olszewski/2017 Special to S.F. Examiner)

Warriors All-Star Stephen Curry returned to the starting lineup on Friday, but scored just 19 points in the Warriors' loss. (Stan Olszewski/2017 Special to S.F. Examiner)

Golden State Warriors: Big three fall silent as Stephen Curry returns to starting lineup in Game 3 of Western Conference Semifinals

During Steve Kerr’s brilliant reign as head coach for the Golden State Warriors, he’s never shied away from making bold and unexpected moves.

Kerr started Nick Young — a wing on the fringes of the playoff rotation — in the first two games of the Western Conference semifinals, even as two-time MVP Stephen Curry was slated to return from injury in Game 2. The Warriors won both.

Then in Game 3 on Friday night at the Smoothie King Center, with the Warriors poised to push the New Orleans Pelicans into a 3-0 hole, Kerr summoned JaVale McGee for the starting five — the same McGee who logged just six minutes in the series opener and drew a DNP-coach’s decision in Game 2.

The tinkering blew up in Kerr’s face as the Warriors dropped Game 3, 119-100. McGee’s involvement was not pretty, nor was the Warriors’ shooting.

Golden State opened the night 1-for-8 from the field. Even Curry, back in his customary starting role after returning Tuesday from a sprained MCL, didn’t escape. The only unanimous MVP in league history didn’t hit his first 3-pointer until the 3:40 mark in the second quarter, and closed the evening 6-for-19 from the field, finishing with 19 points.

Amid a second-quarter charge, it appeared as though Klay Thompson would carry the night. Thompson, who has never been one to dwell on his numbers, followed up his 4-for-20 Game 2 with a scoreless first quarter, but then authored a 20-point second, leading the Warriors to within six at the half, down 62-56.

It was a more than promising scoreline considering the Warriors’ penchant for third-quarter blitzes, and the fact that the Pelicans had knocked down 10 3-pointers — the franchise’s postseason high for any half.

Instead, New Orleans ripped off the third-quarter barrage, opening on a 10-2 run after Kerr once again opted for a starting five with McGee at center. That spiraled into a 21-7 burst as the game descended into a lopsided mess.

Anthony Davis was the undisputed star, dunking all over the Warriors on his way to posting game highs in points (33) and rebounds (18).

Former Warrior reserve Ian Clark was the most efficient participant in the Pelicans’ beatdown, connecting on 7-of-11 shots from the field and 3-of-5 from beyond the arc en route to a 18-point performance in 22 minutes off the bench.

Even as Kerr emptied his bench — including giving Zaza Pachulia his first run since regular season finale on April 10 — the club’s eight backups totaled just 20 points.

Ultimately, it was the inefficiency of the big three — not the fiddling of Kerr or the incompetence of the subs —  that sank the Warriors.

Curry, Thompson and Kevin Durant combined to shoot 39 percent (23-for-59) from the field and 29 percent (7-for-24) from distance.

After missing a triple double by a rebound in Game 2 at Oracle Arena, Draymond Green came within an assist of that milestone again, tallying 11 points, 12 rebounds and nine assists.

The most important stat was the one Green didn’t accrue. The All-Star avoided a technical in the fourth quarter after Rajon Rondo, who has engaged with Green throughout the series, tried to bait him into a tiff with just under five minutes on the clock. Rondo earned a technical for his involvement. Green did not.

Green and the Warriors will resume the series with Game 4 on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. in New Orleans.Anthony DavisDraymond GreenGolden State Warriorsjavale mcgeeKlay ThompsonNBANBA PlayoffsRajon RondoStephen CurrySteve KerrWestern Conference Semifinalszaza pachulia

Just Posted

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read