Giants fans pumped for next round

When Buster Posey scored the run that would win the game for the San Francisco Giants in Game 4 of the National League Division Series, Edgar Posada screamed.

“We’ve got this,” 30-year-old Posada said.

The run, in the top of the seventh inning with the bases loaded, set the tone for the next two innings at Pete’s Tavern, which sits in the shadow of AT&T Park. The dozens of fans who packed into the two-story restaurant and bar paced back and forth, rubbed their heads and prayed to relieve the anxiety.

“This is torture,” fan Steve Franco said while watching Giants pitcher Brian Wilson throw the final pitches in the bottom of the ninth inning with San Francisco leading 3-2.

Wilson, though, came through.

Fans breathed a sigh of relief after Monday night’s game, but all were aware that the next round of the 2010 Major League Baseball postseason could prove to be just as stressful.

The Giants’ win over the Atlanta Braves sent them to the National League Championship Series — a best-of-seven round — against the Philadelphia Phillies. The winner of that matchup will head to the World Series.

Cesar Escobar, though, is confident the Giants have the pitching staff to match that of the Phillies.

“They have three heavyweights and so do we,” he said, referring to the Giants’ Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain and Jonathan Sanchez. “We do need a power hitter, though. We keep getting to 1-0, 2-1 [final scores].”

Nanette Shear, wearing a T-shirt adorned with Wilson’s No. 38, sat at a table with friends paying close attention to the action. She said she was nervous to face the Phillies after their no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds in Game 1 last week.

“It does worry me,” said the 36-year-old, who had left work early to catch the action. “But we can do it.”

Terilyn Goode, 25, traveled from San Jose to sit and watch with Shear and friends. Goode sounded nervous at the thought of the next round.

“It’s going to be tough,” Goode said. “I’ll definitely root for our guys. It’s going to be a good series.”

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Prices for Phillies series tickets reach upper deck

Giants fans who snatched up tickets with hopes that San Francisco’s baseball team would make it to the National League Championship Series are now in possession of a hot commodity.

The Giants’ 3-2 win over the Atlanta Braves on Monday secured their place in the next round. Fans who are not lucky enough to have scored tickets to games 3, 4 or 5 — when San Francisco will host the Philadelphia Phillies — should expect to pay high prices to get in.

Third-deck tickets are selling for up to $1,500 on www.stubhub.com. Bleacher seats range from $170 to $700. Craigslist had bleacher tickets listed at $200 each.

Giants fan Fatima Rodriguez said her husband paid $500 for one ticket if the Braves managed to force a Game 5 in the first round. A second ticket, she said, would have cost them another $400.

Rodriguez expects him to pay similar prices for the next series.

“I would never take the Giants away from him,” she said. “And he asked me beforehand.”

Season-ticket holder Stephanie Vorrises said she looks forward to using her ticket when the Phillies come to town, but because she splits the tickets with five other people, she will have to do just that — wait.

“I’m glad I have them,” Vorrises said. “I also have the second game of the World Series. I hope I get to use those too.”

— Andrea Koskey

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