Draymond Green thinks lesser known players got a raw deal in the NBA's new CBA. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Draymond Green thinks lesser known players got a raw deal in the NBA's new CBA. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Draymond reveals why he reacted negatively to the new CBA

OAKLAND — A day after the NBA and the players association reached a tentative agreement on a new CBA, Draymond Green spent over 14 minutes detailing his frustration with the pact following the Golden State Warriors’ shoot around on Thursday morning.

The forward’s chief gripe is that the deal doesn’t properly compensate end-of-the-bench types like Ian Clark and James Michael McAdoo.

“I never want someone to look at me and say that I am inconsiderate of everybody else’s life outside of the NBA,” Green said. “I grew up in a household where my mom made $16,000 a year. Trust me. I know the struggle and I know how to keep all that stuff in perspective. I do keep it in perspective. However, I do look at things from a business standpoint. I do understand how much money is going around in the NBA on a year-to-year basis. And so, within that realm of how much money is going around, you can elevate those guys.”

In the wake of the reported agreement, Green fired off a string of tweets, including one which read, “That’s a heartbreaker.”

“I’ll be fine. If I can’t live the rest of my life off my contract, then that’s my fault,” said Green, who’s playing on a five-year, $82 million deal. “It’s nobody else’s fault, so it’s not about me being mad for me. It’s about me being frustrated for other guys. When we go in these negotiations, guys are overlooked.”

Green, who is the Dubs’ current union representative, expressed an interest in one day joining the Executive Committee, which both Steph Curry and Andre Iguodala are members of.

“Everybody in the NBA, if you’re in the NBA, you’re making a good living,” Green said. “So, once again, I’m not complaining that everybody isn’t doing pretty well. Everybody isn’t doing pretty good. But at the same time, if you can help some guys do better, why not help them? That’s my whole vision on it. That’s my stand on it. That’s where I’m at. No one can talk me out of that. No one can change my mind on that.”

“Because without all 15 guys, yeah, you can be an All-Star. You can be a max player. But without these guys, you can’t practice. You can’t get a sub. You can’t go through 82 games playing 48 minutes a game. If you get hurt, nobody’s there to step in for you. Every guy matters. And I think every guy should be taken care of.”Draymond GreenGolden State WarriorsNBAnba cba

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