Draymond Green doesn’t think the NBA should release last two-minute reports after a recent release found Kevin Durant committed crucial fouls on Christmas. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Draymond Green doesn’t think the NBA should release last two-minute reports after a recent release found Kevin Durant committed crucial fouls on Christmas. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Draymond Green blasts NBA’s last two-minute reports

The Golden State Warriors and the NBA’s officials haven’t agreed on much this year, as the defending champs are leading the league with 0.9 technical fouls per game. But the two sides do have one thing in common: Their distaste for the league’s last-two minute reports.

The reports, which started toward the end of the 2014-15 season, aim to provide more transparency by scrutinizing every call in the last two minutes of a close game.

Officials don’t like it because they believe it emboldens undue criticism on their already difficult job. And the Warriors think they’re pointless because what’s done is done.

Most recently, the Dubs didn’t care for the NBA finding that Kevin Durant fouled LeBron James three times in the final minutes of their 99-92 Christmas Day win.

“It makes no sense,” Draymond Green told reporters at Wednesday’s shootaround. “LeBron can’t go back and get the play over and get two free throws. Who does it help? That’s not transparency. If anything, it’s putting the official on the spot that missed the call. But you’re not going to put him on the spot in the third quarter. So, why act like you’re blaming the game on them?”

Head coach Steve Kerr has denounced the practice in the past and now it’s become a sticking point of Green, a man of many sticking points.

And he suspects the league knows it’s a bad idea, but it’s being stubborn in its refusal to move away from the practice.

“You know sometimes we do stuff in life … we just don’t want to say like, ‘Yeah, we’re going to go away with this because we started it.’ Maybe the league don’t want to go away with it because they started doing it,” he said. “But I think they should just go away with it.”

It’s unclear whether Green will get his wish by next season. At last year’s NBA Finals, Adam Silver expressed his support for the last two-minute reports, sticking with the talking point that they show the league is committed to being forthright with its fans.

After Monday’s game, James said he was fouled by Durant twice on the decisive drive of the game, when Durant blocked James and the ball hit the Cavs star and went out of bounds.

“But, whatever,” James told reporters. “What are you going to do about it?”

jpalmer@sfexaminer.comCleveland CavaliersDraymond GreenGolden State WarriorsKevin Durantlast two minute reportNBASteve Kerr

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