Starter Ty Blach, pictured May 2017, allowed 7 hits and 4 runs (3 earned) over 5 innings in the Giants' 5-1 loss to the San Diego Padres. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Starter Ty Blach, pictured May 2017, allowed 7 hits and 4 runs (3 earned) over 5 innings in the Giants' 5-1 loss to the San Diego Padres. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Despite outhitting Padres, Giants lose 5-1 on road

The Giants avoided a shutout on the road for the first time this season in a 5-1 loss to the San Diego Padres on Friday.

Ty Blach held the Padres hitless until the fifth, but when San Diego’s offense broke through with a two-run rally. After an infield hit by Christian Villanueva and a single by Austin Hedges, Carlos Asuaje hit a grounder that Brandon Belt bobbled before flipping it to Blach in a close play at first. Asuaje, who dove into the base headfirst, was initially called out, but the call was overturned on review. Padres starter Tyson Ross then singled in the game’s first run, and Jose Pirela’s single stretched the lead to 2-0.

Ross also excelled on the mound, holding San Francisco scoreless until an unearned run came in on Joe Panik’s seventh-inning single. Reliever Craig Stammen then struck out Belt looking and got Andrew McCutchen to bounce into an inning-ending double play, keeping the score at 4-1.

The Padres tacked on two more in the bottom of the sixth on a Villanueva’s RBI double. An RBI single by Freddy Galvis brought home the fourth run.

Blach threw just 81 pitches, but couldn’t record an out in the sixth inning, leaving after Galvis’ RBI. Despite holding the Padres hitless until the fifth, he ended up allowing seven hits and a walk while striking out three. Three of the four runs he allowed were earned.

San Diego quickly restored the four-run lead in the bottom of the seventh on Franchy Cordero’s second home run of the year, which came against Sam Dyson. Left-handed batters are now 6-for-11 against Dyson on the year, including a pair of homers.

Stammen pitched a perfect eighth inning, and after Kazuhisa Makita allowed two baserunners in the top of the ninth, the Padres called on closer Brad Hand. Panik made solid contact against Hand, but Galvis snared it and turned a double play to end the game.

The Giants outhit San Diego 10-8 for the game, but didn’t have a single extra-base hit. The Padres had Cordero’s homer and two doubles, with Hunter Renfroe’s double preceding Villanueva.

The third game of the series is set for 5:40 p.m. on Saturday, with a pair of lefties on the mound in Derek Holland and Clayton Richard.Major League BaseballMLBSan Diego PadresSan Francisco Giantsty blachtyson ross

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