Despite loss, a good day for Stuart Hall

The Knights’ (0-1) 52-2 loss to Crystal Springs Uplands of Hillsborough on Treasure Island was overshadowed by the fact that Stuart Hall was playing its first eight-man football game in school history.

“It’s a great day because we have football,” said Stuart Hall head coach and athletic director John Bertken. “We had a lot of people out here who had fun and they’re going to see us get better.”

The Stuart Hall community did have a considerable turnout on Saturday and Stuart Hall officials spotlight a sense of community as one of the team’s key purposes.

“The thing that’s exciting about it was that it was an event,” said Tony Farrell, Stuart Hall’s head of school. “The biggest thing is to have Saturdays like this. You get Saturday afternoon football. The No. 1 goal is to enhance our guys’ high school experience. I couldn’t be happier.”

Even though the event was a success, on the field it was clear that the two programs are at different levels.

The Knights were clearly outmatched on both sides of the ball, by a Crystal Springs team that went 6-1 last season.

“We didn’t do what we’re capable of doing, but we’re going to learn from this one, obviously,” Bertken said. “We’re going to build on each and every game.”

Crystal Springs, which began its own football program just three seasons ago, outgained the Knights 227-76, led by 162 yards on 18 carries from running back Jeff Grimes.

“It was what we expected,” said Crystal Springs head coach Kevin Thorson. “They did well for their first time ever. They had a few mistakes here and there, but they’ll clean that up.”

Prep sports coverage provided in partnership by The San Francisco Examiner and www.SanFranPreps.com.

Prep Sportssports

Just Posted

Epic Cleantec uses soil mixed with treated wastewater solids to plants at the company’s demonstration garden in San Francisco. (Photo courtesy of Epic Cleantec)
This startup watches what SF flushes – and grows food with it

Epic Cleantec saves millions of gallons of water a year, and helps companies adhere to drought regulations

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for adolescents in the U.S. (Shutterstock)
Why California teens need mental illness education

SB 224 calls for in-school mental health instruction as depression and suicide rates rise

Ahmad Ibrahim Moss, a Lyft driver whose pandemic-related unemployment benefits have stopped, is driving again and relying on public assistance to help make ends meet. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
How much does gig work cost taxpayers?

Some drivers and labor experts say Prop. 22 pushed an undue burden on to everyday taxpayers.

Affordable housing has become the chief expense for most California students, such as those attending community college in San Francisco. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
California commits $500 million more to student housing

Called ‘a drop in the bucket,’ though $2 billion could be made available in future years

Most Read